BA (Hons) in English

Faculty: Faculty of Arts & Social Science (FASS)

Department: Department of English

Program: BA (Hons) in English

Objective

• To achieve excellence in higher education comparable to global standards; to establish equity and guarantee access to higher education by anyone qualified to pursue it, and to prepare the learners as ideal citizens. • Endorse liberal humanitarian values through the study of the masterpieces of English and American literature, non-native writings in English, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, critical theories etc. • Excel, refine and develop responsiveness and cultivate professionalism in manner and behaviour of the students to prepare them as flourishing individuals, future leaders and superior human beings. • Strengthen the morals of the students. • Promote humanitarian causes in a world dominated by commercial motives.

Mission

“In line with the mission of the university, the Department of English of Bangladesh University of Professionals aspires to be a centre of academic excellence and research, professional expertise in English studies and practices both nationally and globally by providing excellent instruction and practical guidance”.

Vision

“To achieve excellence in academic and professional practices and to become citizens of a larger community; the Department of English fosters knowledge and a love of literature and language among students with up-to-date, well-structured curricula through teaching a variety of literary, pedagogical, theoretical and analytical skills”.

General Info

 

Intake : Once in a Year
Application Duration : 23 February 2023 - 15 March 2023

Method of Application : Online through the "Admission Link" of www.bup.edu.bd 

Course Duration : Years: 04 Semester: 08
Total Credit Hours : 126

Total Course Fee : 1,53,000.00 (For Project Group)/1,57,500.00 (For Thesis Group) [Additional Fees if applicable]

 

Eligibility for Admission

 

  1. A candidate must pass SSC/equivalent and HSC/equivalent examination from any discipline/group.
  2. Candidates from Science Group must obtain a total GPA of 9.00 in SSC/equivalent and HSC/equivalent examination with minimum GPA 4.50 in each of the examinations.
  3. Candidates from Business Studies Group must obtain a total GPA of 8.50 in SSC/equivalent and HSC/equivalent examination with minimum GPA 4.00 in each of the examinations.
  4. Candidates from Humanities Group must obtain a total GPA of 8.00 in SSC/equivalent and HSC/equivalent examination with minimum GPA 4.00 in each of the examinations.
  5. Candidates from General Certificate of Education (GCE) O and A level background must pass in minimum 05 (five) and 02 (two) subjects respectively having minimum 26.5 points in total based on the following scale:
    Grade Point
    A*/A 5.00
    B 4.00
    C 3.50
    D 3.00
    Note:   Gradings lower than ‘D’ will not be considered for point calculation.
  6. Candidates from International Baccalaureate (IB) must pass in minimum 06 (six) subjects having minimum 30 points based on the rating scale used in their curriculum (7, 6, 5, 4). Rating of 1, 2 and 3 will not be considered in point calculation.
  7. Candidates applying for admission in the Department of Economics must have minimum ‘A-’ (A Minus) grade in Economics /Accounting/Statistics/Higher  Mathematics either in SSC/equivalent or HSC/equivalent examination. Candidates from ‘O’ Level or ‘A’ Level background must have minimum D grade in any of the above mentioned subjects.

 

 

 

Admission Test Syllabus

 

 

(a) General Knowledge - 40

(b) English - 40

(c) Bangla - 20

 

Weightage

 

 

(1) Written Test=70%, 

(2) Viva-voce=10%, 

(3) HSC/Equivalent Result=10% and 

(4) SSC/Equivalent Result=10%

 

Exam Type

 

 

Admission Test will be taken in MCQ System (100 Marks) and 0.25 marks will be deducted for each wrong answer.

 

Detailed Time Plan and Center for Admission Test

  1. Publication of the List of eligible candidates for Written Exam: 18 March 2023 on BUP Website www.bup.edu.bd.
  2. Admit Cards can be downloaded and printed by the individual applicants from admission.bup.edu.bd from 21 March 2023 onward. But to avoid technical complication, applicants are requested to download the admit card as soon as possible.
  3. Written Tests will be held as per the following schedule: 

    Faculty Date & Day of Written Test Time of Written Test
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

    24 March 2022

    Friday

    10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

 

  • Admission Test (Written) will be conducted in Dhaka city only
  • Viva-voce will be taken in BUP premises.

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  • The course is designed to develop the student's ability to communicate accurately and effectively in English, both orally and in writing, in a wide range of professional situations.It is also designed –to provide the students’ with English skills needed in professional field, to prepare the students as effective communicator for professional environment and to guide them one step ahead in their future career.

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  • To provide the students knowledge of language as a social phenomenon and how language varies from one society to another.
  • To understand the varieties in language due to social context.
  • To recognize and explain the interrelation between language and society.
  • To understand and explain the existence of dialects and various cases of multilingualism in society.
  • To understand and explain the influence of various social factors on language use.
  • To know and use sociolinguistic terms.
  • To describe sociolinguistic concepts.
  • To explain the main laws of sociolinguistics.
  • To analyse pieces of discourse with regard to major sociolinguistic theories.
  • To know and apply the main principles of sociolinguistic research.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will be able to recognize and correctly explain the interrelation between language and society.
  • develop systematic approaches to study the differences in use of language.
  • understand and accurately explain the existence of dialects and various cases of multilingualism in society.
  • understand and accurately explain the influence of various social factors on language use.
  • know sociolinguistic terms and use them properly.
  • correctly describe sociolinguistic concepts.
  • accurately explain the main laws of sociolinguistics.
  • analyse pieces of discourse with regard to major sociolinguistic theories.
  • know and successfully apply the main principles of sociolinguistic research.

References

  • • An Introduction to Sociolinguistics by Ronald Wardhaugh, Sixth Edition. Publisher-Wiley-Blackwell
  • • An Introductory Textbook of Linguistics and Phonetics by DR. R. L. Varshney, Fifth Edition, Publisher- BOC Ltd.
  • • Introduction to Linguistics by M Maniruzzaman, First Edition, Reprint 2014. Publisher- Friends’ Book Corner
  • • Sociolinguistics, 2nd edition by R.A. Hudson. Publisher- Cambridge University Press

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Objectives

  • o to highlight and raise awareness of the importance of teaching materials, and to examine the potential relationship between the syllabus/curriculum and materials; o to study the factors involved in materials evaluation and construction in order to be able to respond flexibly to course objectives and/or learner needs; o to develop in the trainees the capacity to evaluate existing instructional materials (in relation to the teaching-learning context and their teaching purposes); o to help the trainees develop critical reflection on the complexity underlying materials construction, and – with the help of a practical analysis – enable the trainees to consider critically the general principles of materials design; o to consider critically the advantages and impact of carefully selected and evaluated teaching materials on the teaching of English; o to develop in the trainees awareness of the importance of planning for English language teaching; o to develop in the trainees an understanding of how the (subject matter) content, the (learning) objectives and methodology interact in the ELT curriculum/syllabus; o to review different approaches to the ELT syllabus/curriculum design; o to develop in the trainees the ability to deduce the principles of the ELT syllabus/curriculum on the basis of lesson observation and textbook analysis; o to apply ideas from the course to classrooms by developing in the trainees the ability to plan their own (coherent) lesson.

Outcomes

  • to comprehend the methods related to the production of scientific knowledge, to be conscious of the social and professional responsibilities, to recognize themselves as an individual, to use their creative and strong sides, to behave in accordance with the ethics of democracy, human rights, society, science and the profession, to use the language learning strategies effectively, to understand, interpret and evaluate different texts that they may encounter in their daily and professional life,

References

  • ELT theory and Practice by Dr. Binoy Barman
  • A Basic Introduction to English Language Teaching by Ray Mackay
  • Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching by Jack C. Richards and Theodore S. Rodgers etc

Objectives

  • This course will extend and deepen the power of students’ literary critical analysis through in-depth consideration of texts. Students will explore critical debates central to the literature of the seventeenth century. The course will also aim to extend the students’ skills in the reading of narrative and the understanding of the relationship of a text to its cultural/social context. Students will be encouraged to share analytical and critical views on the texts ascribed in class discussion, including, where needed, short presentations, and will focus research skills in the writing of a final essay. This essay will be on a relevant subject of their own choice within the parameters of the course, and will further extend the students’ critical skills and their ability to produce good, clear writing. A final exam will test students’ knowledge of the literature of the period, and give them an opportunity to display their insight, their familiarity with the texts, and the range of their critical ideas.

Outcomes

  •  recognize the features of selected seventeenth-century literary genres  formulate useful questions and cogent arguments about seventeenth-century literature  express literary interpretations in focused, coherent writing  produce a creative project reflecting individual skills and interests  apply literary interpretation effectively  evaluate current criticism independent

References

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Objectives

  • It introducs English Novels and Prose to the students
  • It encourages students to develop their critical reading, writing and thinking skills in order to cope up with contemporary discourses.
  • Finally it will equip students with betterunderstanding of the modern world, its complexities and faces.

Outcomes

  • It introducs English Novels and Prose to the students It encourages students to develop their critical reading, writing and thinking skills in order to cope up with contemporary discourses. Finally it will equip students with betterunderstanding of the modern world, its complexities and faces.
  • It introducs English Novels and Prose to the students It encourages students to develop their critical reading, writing and thinking skills in order to cope up with contemporary discourses. Finally it will equip students with betterunderstanding of the modern world, its complexities and faces.

References

  • Pamela by Samuel Richardson
  • A modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift
  • Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
  • Coverly Papers by Addison and Steele

Objectives

  • General Objective: The general objective of the course is: “to involve students in studying the most common literary theories of Aristotle, Wordsworth and Eliot and in analyzing Johnson’s views of William Shakespeare’s merit as a literary genius”.
  • General Objective: The general objective of the course is: “to involve students in studying the most common literary theories of Aristotle, Wordsworth and Eliot and in analyzing Johnson’s views of William Shakespeare’s merit as a literary genius”.

Outcomes

  • As per the need of the modern world, students have to involve in thinking critically and analytically. Students are given some ready analytical thoughts of the great thinkers, poets and critics with a view to gathering conceptions of different literary aspects and merit and genius of the great people in the field of English literature. The course is also designed with scopes for students to involve in critical analysis of their own.

References

  • Course Reference: 1. Poetics by Aristotle, 2. Preface to Shakespeare by Samuel Johnson 3. Preface to Lyrical Ballad by William Wordsworth
  • Course Reference: 1. Poetics by Aristotle, 2. Preface to Shakespeare by Samuel Johnson 3. Preface to Lyrical Ballad by William Wordsworth

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Objectives

  • The course has a number of objectives. The course aims: • To familiarise the students with a number of English novels written by non-native speakers of English from former colonies. • To get the students acquainted with the different perspectives and thought process of the citizens of formerly colonized nations. • To ensure an informed critical entry of the students into the historical, social, political, cultural and religious, and philosophical contexts of the literary pieces • To inform the learners about the style and genre of different literary pieces taught in the course • To develop the students’ literary skills of locating, evaluating and applying literariness • To allow the learners to acknowledge and appreciate the myriad of cultural, linguistic and geographic diversity illustrated in the texts. • To build up the learners’ critical thinking skill with special emphasis on English novels written in the context of political turmoil surrounding the former colonies.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will:  Be acquainted with, and therefore receive (enlightened) pleasure from reading and feeling the literature of the said age.  Perceive literariness and gain the ability to contextualize and critically evaluate and appreciate the poetry of 17th and 18th century  Gain adequate knowledge on various important texts and their authors belonging to the said time period and have the ability to infer their writing style.  Be able to contextualize the literary pieces by knowing the socio-political, literary and personal background.  Develop interdisciplinary skills and be able to compare and connect with the poetry of the 17th and 18th century with other literary and non-literary pieces.  Be able to evaluate and analyse how the socio-political elements of a particular society and time period may influence its literature.

References

  • Sparknotes Things Fall Apart
  • Shmoop Things Fall Apart
  • Litchart

Objectives

  • The objective of this course is to introduce students to the important writers and literary ideas of Romantic period. Informed with the spirit of the French Revolution, Romantic period is remarkable for its significant political, philosophical and social changes, an exciting representation of which is the poems written by six luminaries of the time

Outcomes

  • At the end of the course students will know about the important writers and literary ideas of Romantic period. They will learn about French Revolution, political, philosophical and social changes of that era. After the completion of this course, the students will be able to locate and critique how diverse political, philosophical and social changes informed the writings of six luminaries of the time

References

  • Text book of William Blake Text book of William Wordsworth Text book of S. T. Coleridge Text book of George Gordon Byron Text book of P. B. Shelley Text book of John Keats

Objectives

  • The General Objective of the course is- to involve students into exploring the thoughts, ideas, doctrines and styles and overall literary genius of three poets and a prose writer of Victorian era.
  • Specific Objectives • To involve students in exploring, enjoying and learning thoughts, ideas and doctrines of Victorian poet Browning, Arnold and Tennyson, • To involve students in interpreting thoughts, ideas and doctrines of Victorian author John Stuart Mill, • To involve students in critical thinking to reproduce the thoughts, ideas and doctrines in their own ways.
  • General Objective: To involve students into exploring the thoughts, ideas, doctrines and styles and overall literary genius of three poets and a prose writer of Victorian era.
  • SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES - To involve students in exploring, enjoying and learning thoughts, ideas and doctrines of Victorian poet Browning, Arnold and Tennyson, - To involve students in interpreting thoughts, ideas and doctrines of Victorian author John Henry Newman - To involve students in critical thinking to reproduce the thoughts, ideas and doctrines in their own ways.

Outcomes

  • At the end of the course, students will gather the basic philosophic, political and religious concepts of the Victorian period.
  • Learning Life and Thinking of the English nation through studying Victorian Poetry and Prose
  • After studying Victorian Poetry and Prose, sgudent will be able to gather socio- political, economic, philosophical and psychological insights of the English nation duting the Victorian Era. religious

References

  • • C. B. Tinker and H. F. Lowry (editors), The Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold, Oxford University Press, 1950. • Kenneth Allott (editor), The Poems of Matthew Arnold, London and New York: Longman Norton, 1965. • DeVane, William Clyde. A Browning Handbook. 2nd Ed. Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1955. • Drew, Philip. The Poetry of Robert Browning: A critical introduction. Methuen, 1970. • Tennyson, Hallam, Alfred Lord Tennyson: A Memoir. Volume 1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2012. • Mill, John Stuart, On Liberty, Harvard Classics: Collier & Sons Company New York 1909
  • Texbooks/ Reference Books
  • Optional Reference Books

Objectives

  • This course will extend and deepen the power of students’ literary critical analysis through in-depth consideration of texts. Students will explore critical debates central to the literature of the nineteenth century. The course will also aim to extend the students’ skills in the reading of narrative and the understanding of the relationship of a text to its cultural/social context. Students will be encouraged to share analytical and critical views on the texts ascribed in class discussion, including, where needed, short presentations, and will focus research skills in the writing of a final essay. This essay will be on a relevant subject of their own choice within the parameters of the course, and will further extend the students’ critical skills and their ability to produce good, clear writing. A final exam will test students’ knowledge of the literature of the period, and give them an opportunity to display their insight, their familiarity with the texts, and the range of their critical ideas.

Outcomes

  • ENG 3629: 19th Century English Novel At the end of this course, learners will be able to:  recognize the features of selected nineteenth-century literary genres  formulate useful questions and cogent arguments about nineteenth-century literature  express literary interpretations in focused, coherent writing  produce a creative project reflecting individual skills and interests  apply literary interpretation effectively  evaluate current criticism independently  interpret the texts from diverse theoretical perspectives

References

  • ENG 3629 19th Century English Novel

Objectives

  • To help students understand and study ancient literatures that have shaped the development of epic and drama in the later periods.
  • To enable them gain knowledge of world literary traditions and the continuing influence of those traditions on world cultures.
  • To help them gain an understanding of literary texts within social, cultural, and historical contexts.
  • To make the students familiar with the styles of authors of classical literature.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will be able to-
  • demonstrate knowledge of world literary traditions and the continuing influence of those traditions on world cultures, including an awareness of emergent global literary trends.
  • develop skills in literary analysis and critical writing, be aware of comparative methodologies and literary theory, and demonstrate the ability to apply them in examining literary texts and other cultural products.
  • gain an understanding of literary texts within social, cultural, and historical contexts.
  • appreciate literature and other cultural production as inextricable from the identity formation of individuals and their communities and consider literary texts as part of discursive systems.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the classics in a historical context and an understanding of cultural information about the Greeks and Romans.
  • demonstrate an ability to conduct research on classical subjects by using different reference works and sources in book form and on the internet.

References

  • Agamemnon by Aeschylus (Aeschylus Agamemnon, Translated by Philip Vellacott)
  • The Iliad by Homer (Homer’s The Iliad, Translated by E. V. Rieu, Edited by Peter Jones)
  • The Aeneid by Virgil (Virgil The Aeneid, Translated into English Prose with an Introduction by W. F. Jackson Knight)
  • Mahabharata by Vyasa (A shortened Modern Prose Version by R K Narayan)
  • Mythology by Edith Hamilton
  • The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Translated by Robert Fagles
  • Homer: A Collection of Critical Essays, Edited by George Steiner and Robert Fagles
  • Homer’s Iliad, Bloom’s Notes by Harold Bloom
  • Available Coles, York and Cliffnotes on all the texts
  • Greek Myths by Robert Graves
  • A Cambridge Companion to Greek Mythology

Objectives

  • To familiarize students with some significant and culturally diverse examples, both canonical and non-canonical, of American literature between the 17th and mid19th centuries • to introduce students to some of the major literary genres and modes employed by writers of the period • to provide students with the opportunity to examine some recurring themes ir the literature of the period • to help students understand the relevance of the literature of past to the modern world • to give students practice in analyzing, discussing, and writing about the literature.

Outcomes

  • The students are expected to write effective papers to analyze style, structure, theme, and other features of a poem.

References

  • Text of the poem by Walt Whitman
  • Text of the poem by Emily Dickinson
  • Text of the poem by Ezra Pound
  • Text of the poem by Robert Frost
  • Text of the poem by Allen Ginsberg
  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

Objectives

  • The course attempts to involve learners in exploring 20th century American literature and knowing the social, political and psychological contexts of 20th century American life and develop their critical thinking and ability of analytical assessment.

Outcomes

  • By the end of the study of the course, students are supposed to be able to read ‘American’ literature in English more smoothly and productively by situating a literary piece against the socio-political background of the 20th century USA. After the completion of the course, the students will be acquainted with a wide range of stylistic, structural, and narrative trends that impacted upon the 20th century American literature and, hence will be able to read ‘American’ literature in English more productively by situating a literary piece against the socio-political background of the 20th century USA, ranging from the ‘Roaring Twenties’ to the ‘Lost Generation.’

References

  • The Scarlet Letter (Text) by Nathaniel Hawthorn
  • The Old Man and the Sea (Text) by Earnest Hemingway
  • The Bluest Eye (Text) by Toni Morrison
  • To Kill a Mocking Bird (Text) by Harper Lee
  • American Literature and Culture 1900-1960 by Gail McDonald, published by London: Blackwell Publishing, 2006.
  • The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism by Walter Kalaidjian, published by Cambridge: CUP, 2005.
  • The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller. 2nd Edition by W. E. Bigsby, published by Cambridge: CUP, 2010.
  • Literature, Literary History, and Cultural Memory by Herbert Grabes, published by Germany: Gunter Narr Verlag Tübigen, 2005.
  • The Gun and the Pen: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and the Fiction of Mobilization by Keith Gandal, published by Oxford: OUP, 2008.

Objectives

  • Course Objectives: The course, Eng. 4733: 20th Century Novel/Fiction, is designed with the following things in mind; a. To orient students with 20th English Novels at a higher level. b. To help them learn how to read novels as academic work c. To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading novels along with getting pleasure

Outcomes

  • The major objective of this course is to orient and enlighten students about the 20th century novels of English literature. By the end of this course, students will be able to:  Apply the gained knowledge to explain contemporary dynamics in Literature.  Fathom how a piece of work can reflect the nature of a socio-political incident.  Analyze the contemporary events from literary viewpoint.  Write a detailed paper on a particular play explaining from diverse perspectives.

References

  • Required Course Materials: Textbooks  Joseph Conrad : Heart of Darkness;  E. M. Forster : A Passage to India  D. H. Lawrence : Sons and Lovers;  Virginia Woolf : Mrs. Dalloway. Helping Books:  A Glossary of Literary Terms by M. H. Abrams  English Literature: A Student Guide by Martin Stephen  Advanced Literary Essays by Ajit Kimar Banarjee  The Art of Fiction by David Lodge  An Outline of English Literature by William H. Hudson  Aspects of Novels by E M Forster  The Rise of the Novel by Ian Watt  Beginning Theory by Peter Barry  Critical Theory Today by Lois Tyson  The World, the Text and the Critic by Edward Said  A Glossary of Contemporary Literary Theory by Jeremy Hawthon  The Moral Imagination of Joseph Conrad by Sirajul Islam Choudhury  The Enemy Territory by Sirajul Islam Choudhury Journal Articles 1. Mahdi Bakhtiari Hojja et al. (2013), By the Name of Nature but against Nature: An Ecological Study of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. 2. Abdullatif Al-Khaiat (2010), Joseph Conrad: Defender or Condemner of Imperialism? 3. Daniel Vogel (2012), JOSEPH CONRAD IN THE LIGHT OF POSTCOLONIALISM. 4. Wilson Harris (2011), The Frontier on Which "Heart of Darkness" Stands 5. Ji Junjun (2017), Anti-Colonialism in Heart of Darkness. 6. NIDESH LAWTOO, A Picture of Europe: Possession Trance in Heart of Darkness 7. Clive Barnett (2010), A Choice of Nightmares': Narration and desire in Heart of Darkness 8. Achebe, Chinua. "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness'" Massachusetts Review. 18. 1977. 9. Edward Said, “Two Visions in Heart of Darkness” Culture and Imperialism, (1993) pp. 22-31. 10. Inger Hansson (2015) A FREUDIAN PERSPECTIVE ON COLONIALISM IN HEART OF DARKNESS 11. Farough Fakhimi Anbaran (2015), Multiple Perspectives Toward Women in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness: A Feministic Overview 12. Srila Nayak (2012), Two Narratives of Modernism in Heart of Darkness 13. Willow Carr, The Representation of Women in Heart of Darkness 14. Sarah Tavassoli (2014), Postcolonial-Feminist elements in E. M. Forster's A Passage to India 15. PENELOPE PETHER, E.M. Forster's A Passage to India: A Passage to the Patria 16. Wilfrid R. Koponen , Krishna at the Garden Party: Crises of Faith in A Passage to India 17. Gulzar Jalal Yousafzai∗ & Qabil Khan (2011). Rudeness, Race, Racism and Racialism in E.M. Forster’s “A Passage to India” 18. Lidan Lin Ms (1997). The Irony of Colonial Humanism: A Passage to India and the Politics of Post-humanism. ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature.28 (4), 133-153. University of Calgary. 19. Mason, Samantha A., "Images of the Other: Race, Gender, and the Imperial Relationship in Heart of Darkness, a Passage to India, and Burmese Days" (2016).English Undergraduate Honors Theses. 7. 20. Rama KUNDU (2005). India through British Eyes in E. M. Forster’s “A Passage to India” 21. Jo Moran (1988). E M Forster’s A Passage to India: What Really Happened in the Caves 22. Sarah Rhoads Nilsen (2011), Power, Distance, and Stereotyping Between Colonizer and Colonized and Men and Women in A Passage to India 23. Hussein Theeb Albakrawi et al (2013), Marxism and Sons and Lovers 24. LI Haiyan (2016), Paul Morel’s Oedipus Complex in Sons and Lovers 25. Nozar Niazi (2013), A Stylistic Analysis of D.H. Lawrence’s ‘Sons and Lovers’ 26. HELEN BARON. Disseminated Consciousness in Sons and Lovers 27. Minodora Otilia SIMION (2014), MODERNISM AND VIRGINIA WOOLF’S NOVEL MRS.DALLOWAY 28. David Powers Corwin (2015)Women as Part of the Patriarchy: Masculinity, Women, and Relationships in Virginia Woolf’s Novels 29. Jin Wang et all (2017), Traumatic Narrative in Virginia Woolf’s Novel Mrs. Dalloway 30. Eda Burcu Çetinkaya (2017), Mrs. Dalloway Revised: The Sense of Change and Disillusionment 31. Ban Wang (1992)"I" ON THE RUN: CRISIS OF IDENTITY IN MRS. DALLOWAY Useful Links & Web Addresses • www.gradesaver.com • www.enotes.com • https://study.com • http://www.supersummary.com • www.owleyes.org • www.litcharts.com • interestingliterature.com • http://sittingbee.com • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiRXScD4nuw • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41efSGPTI5Y

Objectives

  • The course has a number of objectives. The course aims: • To read a selection of poetry and plays that enunciate the inherent qualities of the modernist movement • To ensure an informed critical entry of the students into the historical, social, political, cultural, religious, and philosophical contexts of the literary pieces • To inform the learners about the style and genre of different prose pieces taught in the course • To familiarize students with the subsidiary movements of modernism that influence modern literature as well as art and reflect the contemporary socio-political and economic situation. • To build up the learners’ critical thinking skill with special emphasis on poetry and drama written during this time period and how these are interrelated with the socio-political realities of the time.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will:  Be acquainted with, and therefore receive (enlightened) pleasure from reading and feeling the literature of the said age.  Perceive literariness and gain the ability to contextualize and critically evaluate and appreciate British and Irish poetry and drama of 20th century (modern)  Gain adequate knowledge on various important texts and their authors belonging to the said time period and have the ability to infer their writing style.  Be able to contextualize the literary pieces by knowing the socio-political, literary and personal background.  Develop interdisciplinary skills and be able to compare and connect the poetry and prose of 20th century with other literary and non-literary pieces.  Be able to evaluate and analyse how the socio-political elements of a particular society and time period may influence its literature.  Be familiarized with and can explore significant modernist literary movements, such as surrealism, regionalism, post colonialism, and theatre of the absurd.

References

  • Pirandello Text
  • Yeats Gyre Theory
  • Eliot Sparknotes
  • Yeats Sparknotes
  • Poetry Resources
  • Bookfi- Book resources

Objectives

  • Objective: Objective The objective of the course is- to develop students’ general understanding of the basic approaches, concepts and framework of research processes, research designs and research techniques.

Outcomes

  • Learning Outcome: The students are expected to gain an overall understanding about research and be able to conduct a research work, produce a thesis and evaluate a scholarly writing and its quality.

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • Objectives: But how comfortable are they in the world of 'English' literature? To what extent does the English establishment accept and incorporate South Asian writing? Or is it more correct to understand the emergence of writing from this region of the world as lively, but essentially marginal to 'canonical' European writers like James Joyce or Ernest Hemingway? Put another way, South Asian literature might be seen as simply 'exotic' and 'different,' and not as important or lasting literature. These are the question of canonicity, is one that each South Asian writer seems to respond to in his or her own way, which we will focus while learning this course. South Asian writers use European techniques such as modernism and postmodernism, and modify or inflect them in unique ways.

Outcomes

  • Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module a student will acquire:  An advanced knowledge of distinctive literary strategies and devices deployed in South Asian literature in English;  A critical understanding of South Asian literary texts in their appropriate historical and cultural contexts;  An understanding of key critical (postcolonial) and theoretical approaches applied to these writings;  The ability to produce critical accounts of the literature, paying appropriate attention to both formal and contextual issues.

References

  • Required course materials: Textbooks: Mulk Raj Anand Untouchable Kamala Das “An Introduction,” “The Invitation,” “The Freaks,” “The Looking-Glass,”“The Old Playhouse” Begum Rokeya Sultana’s Dream Monica Ali Brick Lane Tahmima Anam A Golden Age Arundhati Roy The God of Small Things Recommended reading McDonald, Gail. American Literature and Culture 1900-1960. London: Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Kalaidjian, Walter. The Cambridge Companion to American Modernism. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Bigsby, W. E. The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller. 2nd Edition. Cambridge: CUP, 2010. Grabes, Herbert. Literature, Literary History, and Cultural Memory. Germany: Gunter Narr Verlag Tübigen, 2005. Gandal, Keith. The Gun and the Pen: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and the Fiction of Mobilization, Oxford: OUP, 2008. Urgo, Joseph R & Ann J. Abadie. (eds.) Faulkner and His Contemporaries. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2004.

Objectives

  • Course Objective: This course attempts to introduce students with different Shakespearean theories and their relations to reality of human life.

Outcomes

  • Course Outcome: After studying the plays of Shakespeare, students will gather knowledge about how pragmatic and axiomatic to life and reality Shakespearean literary works are.
  • Course Outcome: After studying the plays of Shakespeare, students will gather knowledge about how pragmatic and axiomatic to life and reality Shakespearean literary works are.

References

  • Texts: 1. Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Oxford University Press, 2. Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Willy, 3. The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Black Well, 1995, 4. As You Like it By William Shakespeare, Mc Millan, 1997.
  • Other Reference Books: 1. Auberlen, Eckhard (1991). "The Tempest and the Concerns of the Restoration Court: A Study of The Enchanted Island and the Operatic Tempest". Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660–1700. Dusinberre, Juliet, ed. (2006). As You Like It. Arden Shakespeare, third series. Bloomsbury Publishing. 3.Rasmussen, Eric, eds. (2007). Complete Works. The RSC Shakespeare. New York: Royal Shakespeare Company.

Objectives

  • The course, Eng. 4838: -World Literature is designed with the following things in mind; a. To orient students with world literature at a higher level. b. To help them learn how to read novels as academic work c. To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading novels along with getting pleasure

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • Main Texts
  • Helping Books
  • Useful links

Objectives

  • Course Objectives: The course aims to:  unfold the traditional approach to the analysis of English language.  familiarize students with the gradual development of the analyses of English language such as The Structural Grammar and the Transformational-Generative grammar.  critically examine how the construction of English sentences are analyzed in different approaches mentioned above.  introduce English grammatical categories and the basic elements of the language to the students.  enable students to break sentences into their component constituents.  introduce the structural approach to language analysis to the students  acquaint student with key constructs of the Transformational-Generative Grammar such as Deep structure vs. Surface structure, Government and Binding theories etc.

Outcomes

  • Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this course, students are expected to:  develop an insight of the three approaches to language analyses: Traditional, Structural and Transformational-Generative grammars  be able to analyze and interpret a wide range of syntactic and morphological structures in English  conceptualize and use English modals appropriately (such as core vs. periphrastic, epistemic vs. deontic)  demonstrate ability to use articles and definiteness in English.  understand the complexities of English tenses and the intertwined effects of its aspects  develop mastery in wide range of English structures including English conditionals.  undertake guided research on a topic in English morphology, syntax, or style.

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • This course introduces students to the language & media. At the end of the course they will learn about media & communication, its history, types, use etc.

Outcomes

  • Learning outcomes for this Element include these criteria: 1. Critically analyzing significant creative, literary, philosophical or religious works. 2. Understanding and discussing the complex blend of imaginative vision, socio-cultural context, ethical values, and aesthetic judgment in creative, philosophical or religious works. 3. Recognizing, evaluating and responding to creative, philosophical or religious works. 4. Developing appropriate and ethical applications of knowledge in the humanities or the arts.

References

  • Understanding Media by Marshal McKLuhan
  • ‘New media history’ by Flichy and Livingstone
  • The Oxford Handbook of New Audiovisual Aesthetics by ohn Richardson, Claudia Gorbman, and Carol Vernallis
  • Media Effects: Advances in Theory and Research, 3rd Edition by Jennings Bryant
  • Media Discourse by Norman

Objectives

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1st Semester

Objectives

  • To improve learners’ English communication skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) needed at tertiary level.
  • To work as a remedial course for those who have troubles with grammar, vocabulary or basic communication skills and help them gain confidence.
  • To teach the use of English in real-life situations with accuracy and efficiency.
  • To develop students’ creative skills in reading and writing tasks.
  • To develop students’ study skills needed in higher education.
  • To make students confident, wise and ethically sound presenters.
  • To enable students to create appropriate oral responses to various communication situation, both formal and informal.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will be able to develop their reading skill through various reading techniques (skimming, scanning, inference, summarizing etc.) which will enable them to understand, analyze and evaluate reading texts.
  • Distinguish between active and passive listening and respond accordingly.
  • Acquire a good command over structure and techniques of writing by practicing writing different types of paragraphs and essays.
  • Interpret and analyze different aural discourses in English.
  • Demonstrate oral fluency both in individual and group presentations.
  • Utilize techniques that are necessary for fluent and confident presentation.
  • Vocabulary lessons will help to develop students’ ability to express themselves in a more developed way both in writing and speaking for academic and other purposes.
  • Through an inductive way of learning grammar, students will be able to understand and apply grammatical rules in their writing and speaking.
  • Classroom interaction, group discussions, peer feedback, individual or group presentation will enhance students’ capacity to think critically, organize and present their own thoughts and ideas in English.

References

  • English Skills 7th Edition
  • From Paragraph to Essay
  • Grammar and Composition 3rd Course
  • Practical English Usage 3rd Edition
  • Common Mistakes in English Sixth Edition
  • New GRE Vocabulary Solution 3.0
  • Public Speaking: College and Career 5th Edition
  • Cliffs TOEFL Latest Edition
  • Barron’s TOEFL Latest Edition
  • Academic Writing Fourth Edition

Objectives

  • • The course intends to equip students with factual knowledge and analytical skills that will enable them to learn and critically appreciate history, politics, and economy of Bangladesh. • Introduce students with rich history, culture and heritage of Bangladesh. • Provide them in-depth knowledge on the major political events that shaped Bangladesh as an independent sovereign state. • Improve their understanding on political, economic and social development of Bangladesh. • Increase understanding on the challenges and potentials of Bangladesh in shaping its peaceful and sustainable future.

Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of this course, the students will be able to: • Achieve comprehensive idea about the history, culture and heritage of Bangladesh. • Enrich themselves in economy, society, politics, diplomacy and foreign policy of Bangladesh. • Learn about the challenges and potentials of Bangladesh in shaping its peaceful and sustainable future. • Assess roles and contribution of Bangladesh in the regional and international bodies.

References

  • Avãyjøvn dviæK, evsjv‡`‡ki A_©‰bwZK BwZnvm | Avãyj nvwg`, cjøx Dbœqb evsjv‡`k | Kvgvj wmwÏKx, evsjv‡`‡k f~wg ms¯‹v‡ii ivRbxwZ | Gough, Kathleen and Hari P. Sharma (Eds.). Imperialism and Revolution in South Asia. New York: Monthly Review Press: 1977. Islam, Sirajul. (Ed.) Banglapedia. English Version. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh, ---. History of Bangladesh 1704-1971. 3rd ed. (3 vols.). Dhaka: Asiatic society of Bangladesh. Khan, Azizur Rahman and Mahabub Hossain. The Strategy of Development in Bangladesh. London: Macmillan, 1989. Khan, Mohammad Mohabbat and John P Thorp. Bangladesh: Society, Politics and Bureaucracy. Centre for Administrative Studies: 1984. Rashid, Haroon Ar. Geography of Bangladesh. Dhaka: UPL, 1977.

Objectives

  • Objectives
  • The course has the following objectives:
  • •To orient students with the basics of Poetry and Rhetoric. •To help them learn how to read literary works as academic work •To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading literary works.

Outcomes

  • Upon the completion of this course, the students will be: • Well familiarized with poems of different languages (translated into English), genres and forms, ranging from the sonnet and elegy to concrete poetry • Able to write effective papers to analyze style, structure, theme, and other features of poems.

References

  • Poetry Source 1
  • Poetry Source 2
  • Poetry Source 3
  • Book Source
  • Tagore
  • Sites for Poetry Analysis 1
  • Sites for Poetry Analysis 2
  • Sites for Poetry Analysis 3

Objectives

  • This course aims to explain the world around us through sociological imagination.
  • It introduces sociology as a discipline and sociological ways of understanding human social interaction and processes such as socialization, deviance, culture/society, and social change. This class teaches the use of sociology in class via small-group exercises and the use of computers to explore questions about the social world.

Outcomes

  • The learning outcome will be added with the particular lessons

References

  • Richard T. Schaefer, Sociology, 2014
  • Anthony Giddens. Sociology (Update Version)

Objectives

  • Recognize basic computer hardware architecture constructs such as instructions sets, memory, CPU, external devices, and data representation. Use programming software tools including compilers, linkers, editors, and integrated development environments to create and test programs. Demonstrate problem solving skills by developing algorithms to solve problems incorporating the concept of variables and constants of basic data types in a computer program. Utilize programming constructs which uses input and output devices for acquiring and displaying data including sequential files. Create programming designs which includes step-by-step algorithms and desk checking to validate problem solutions. Incorporate the use of sequential, selection and repetition control structures into the algorithms implemented as computer programs. Demonstrate an understanding of structured design by implementing programs with functions and passing of parameters to solve more complex problems and to promote the concept of efficient use of code. Design and implement programs using arrays Design and write programs which use data consisting of words and sentences using the string object.

Outcomes

  • # Describe the usage of computers and why computers are essential components in business and society. # Utilize the Internet Web resources and evaluate on-line e-business system. # Solve common business problems using appropriate Information Technology applications and systems. # Identify categories of programs, system software and applications. Organize and work with files and folders. # Describe various types of networks network standards and communication software.

References

  • Textbooks 1. Norton: Introduction to Computers 2. L Balagurushamy: Programming in C++ Recommended reading 1. Norton: Inside PC 2. C S Frence: Computer Science 3. Warford: Computer Science

2nd Semester

Objectives

  • To improve learners’ Listening and Speaking skills needed at tertiary level.
  • To work as a remedial course for those who have difficulties in these skills.
  • To help students strengthen communication skills: verbal communication, nonverbal communication
  • To improve their listening skill with a view to enabling students to attend classes and seminars efficiently, speak clearly and convincingly at workplace and make formal presentation and public speech.

Outcomes

  • Develop their skills through various activities which will enable them to use English language practically.
  • Develop their abilities to express themselves for academic and other purposes.
  • Enhance their capacity to think critically through various activities, interactions, group discussions, peer feedback, individual or group presentation,

References

  • British Council
  • BBC
  • Communication
  • Effortless English

Objectives

  • The objectives of this course are to enable the students to- • To help the students apply reading strategies to understand academic texts. • To improve the students’ ability to interpret academic texts by using critical reading techniques. • To develop effective paraphrasing and summarizing skills. • To enable the students to use the reading and writing skills practiced in class to analyse academic readings and integrate ideas into their own writing. • To give the students exposure to different types academic writing. • To develop skills in writing well-organized compositions and also to teach how to edit and revise their own as well as peer’s writing. • To demonstrate an ability to prepare and deliver effective academic write ups. • To inform students about academic ethics and how to ensure it.

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • Texts
  • Additional References

Objectives

  • বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্য :
  • ‘বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্য’ এই কোর্সটি পাঠ করলে বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্যের সূচনা, বিকাশ হবে।
  • বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্য’ এই কোর্সটি পাঠ করলে পরিণতি সম্পর্কে মানসম্পন্ন জ্ঞান অর্জন সম্ভব হবে

Outcomes

  • ‘বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্য’

References

  • বাংলা সাহিত্যের রূপরেখা (1ম ও ২য় খণ্ড) : গোপাল হালদার, লাল নীল দীপাবলি : হুমায়ূন আজাদ, বাংলা সাহিত্যের ব্যাকরণ, আনন্দ, ভারতচন্দ্র ও রামপ্রসাদ : শ্রীশিবপ্রসাদ ভট্টাচার্য, বাংলা বানান : সমস্যা ও সম্ভাবনা : পবিত্র সরকার, পকেট বাংলা ব্যাকরণ : পবিত্র সরকার সরকার

Objectives

  • • To orient students with basic forms of English Prose with respect to its development, language, style, structure and other generic features. • To help them learn how to read literary works as academic work • To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading literary works apart from getting pleasure

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will be able to: • Analyze and critique the ways a prose narrative is formed • Understand the changing patterns of writings based on the need of time and place. • To write effective papers to analyze style, structure, theme, and other features of a prose piece.

References

  • Barnet, Sylvan. An Introduction to Literature: Fiction, Poetry and Drama. New York: Pearson Longman, 2008. Hadfield, Andrew (Ed.) The Oxford Handbook of English Prose (1500-1640). London: Oxford University Press, 2013. Kennedy, X. J. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing. USA: Pearson, 2015. Lodge David. The Art of Fiction. UK: Randomhouse, 2012. Rand Ayn. The Art of Fiction: A Guide for Writers and Readers. London: Plume, 2000. Norton Anthology of English Literature, American Literature Penguin/Pelican Guides to English Literature, Edited, Boris Ford Reading at University: A Guide for Students, Govin & Susan Fairbairn

Objectives

  • To orient students with basics of plays and stage craft.
  • To help them learn how to read plays as academic work
  • To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading and analyzing plays.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will be well familiarized with the theory and craft of drama and theatre.
  • They will be able to write effective papers to analyse style, structure, theme, and other features of plays.
  • They will be able to apply the gained knowledge to explain contemporary dynamics in Literature.

References

  • Poetics by Aristotle (Aristotle’s Poetics, translated by T. S. Dorsch)
  • Natyashashtra by Bharata Muni
  • King Oedipus by Sophocles (Sophocles King Oedipus, English translation of the text)
  • The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice (text), edited by M.M. Mahmood)
  • Riders to the Sea by John Millington Synge (Riders to the Sea by J. M. Synge, edited by R. K. Kaul)
  • The Importance of Being Ernest by Oscar Wilde (Text of The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, published by Penguin Books)
  • Aristotle’s Poetics, A criticism collection compiled by Friends’ Book Corner
  • Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, edited by Harold Bloom
  • Penguine Passnotes on The Merchant of Venice
  • MacMillan Master Guides on The Merchant of Venice
  • Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice, A Selection of Critical Essays edited by John Wilders
  • Brodie’s Notes on The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

3rd Semester

Objectives

  • The course, Eng- 2001: History of England & English Literature, is designed with the following things in mind; a. To orient students with English Literary History at a deeper level. b. To help them learn how to read History of Literature as academic work c. To helps students discover the significance of context and its relation with a text. d. To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading history along with literature.

Outcomes

  • The major objective of this course is to orient and enlighten students about the basics of English literature except for poetry. By the end of this course, students will be able to:  Apply the gained knowledge to explain contemporary dynamics in Literature.  Fathom how a piece of work can reflect the nature of a socio-political incident.  Fathom how the nature of a socio-political incident can influence a piece of work  Analyze the contemporary events from literary viewpoint.  Write a detailed paper on a work or event explaining from diverse perspectives.

References

  • Required Course Materials: Texts: a. English Literature by William J. Long b. A Study of English History by Prof L. Mukherjee Reference Books: a. History of English Literature by Edward Albert b. An Outline of English Literature by William Henry Hudson c. A Short History Of English Literature by Ifor Evans d. A History of The English language by Albert C Baugh et al, 5th edition e. The History of English by Ishtla Singh f. A short History of English Literature by Emile Legouis g. An ABC of English Literature by Dr. Mofizur Rahman Optional Books : 1. A Glossary of Literary Terms by M. H. Abrams 2. Poetics by Aristotle 3. English Literature: A Student Guide by Martin Stephen 4. Advanced Literary Essays by Ajit Kimar Banarjee 5. Elizabethan Popular Theatre Michael Hattaway 6. Criticism of Elizabethan and Jacobean drama by Irving Ribner 7. The Elizabethan world picture by E. M. W. Tillyard 8. Perspectives on Restoration Drama by Sue Owen 9. English drama, 1660-1700 by Derek Hughes 10. The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy Edited by Claire McEachern 11. The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Contemporary Dramatists Edited by Ton Hoenselaars 12. The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Tragedy Edited by Emma Smith, Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr Journal Articles: A. Rekha Devi (2016), Industrial revolution: How it effect Victorian literature in a progressive or adverse way B. Amanda Anderso (2016), BOOK REVIEW Victorian Liberalism and Political Realism C. Elder Blair Apperson (1954) A study of Chaucer's influence on English literature through Dryden D. DAVID MATTHEWS ed. (2012), Studies in the Age of Chaucer E. Shankar Kumar (2011), The History of English Literature: A Review F. Nichole Lindquist-Kleissler (2014), Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I of England: Representations of Gender, Influence, and Power G. Jennifer Summit (2012), Renaissance Humanism and the Future of the Humanities H. Michael ZiSSER. The Rebirth of Beauty: Art of the Renaissance I. Sara Martín Alegre. Post-war English Literature 1945-1990 Useful Links & Web Addresses • https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-romantics • www.enotes.com • https://study.com • http://www.supersummary.com • www.owleyes.org • www.litcharts.com • interestingliterature.com • http://sittingbee.com • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiRXScD4nuw • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41efSGPTI5Y

Objectives

  • • To give the students exposure to the social and political history of England. • To enlighten students with the social and political history of Europe with a critical focus on the formation of the ‘United Kingdom.’ • To provide students with an understanding of shaping of culture and literature with different socio-political reality in different time.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will be able to: • Understand if and how the culture, society, and history of England are shaped by different European and national movements and events and how these movements shaped the development of English literary periods. • Demonstrate ability to explain and interpret major social and political movement ever happened in the history England. • Apply the understanding of history to interpret corresponding literature.

References

  • Blanning, T C W (Ed.). The Oxford History of Modern Europe. 1996. Oxford: OUP, 2000. Kerpat, Kemal H. Studies on Ottoman Social and Political History. Leiden: Brill, 2002. Thompson, F M L (Ed.). The Cambridge Social History of Britain (1750-1950). Cambridge: CUP, 1990. Trevelyan, G M. Social History of England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • Upon completing this course students will be able to:  Describe and distinguish key ethical concepts, including concepts such as good, right, permissible, free will, empiricism, rationalism, criticism, intuitionism, etc.  Read and comprehend literary texts and interpret them from the viewpoint of philosophy.  Describe, explain and distinguish key concepts in critical thinking and analyze specific arguments for consistency and credibility  Identify, and explain the various philosophical approaches to art and beauty.  Read and comprehend key texts in aesthetics from historical and contemporary sources.  Apply philosophical methods to examine objects and artifacts for their aesthetic value.

References

  • Blocker, H Gene, World Philosophy: An East-West Comparative Introduction to Philosophy, Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2010
  • Fisher, Alec, Critical Thinking: An Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001
  • Dickie, G., Introduction to Aesthetics, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997
  • Heywood, A., Key Concepts in Politics, Palgrave Macmillan, 2000
  • Lillie, William, Ethics, An Introduction to Ethics, London: Methuen, 1948
  • Perry, John, Michael Bartman and John Marin Fisher, Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015
  • Russell, Bertrand, A History of Western Philosophy, London: Allen & Unwin, 1945
  • Thilly, F., A History of Western Philosophy, New York: H. Holt and Company, 1914

Objectives

  • The objectives of this course are:  To help students attain a command of Old English such that, armed with a good dictionary, students will be able to understand and appreciate any piece of Old English Literature.  Enable students to come to an understanding of the culture, the literature, and the history of the Anglo Saxons.  To provide a general historical framework for the period as it introducing students to the culture of Anglo-Saxon England.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will be:  Perceive literariness and gain the ability to contextualize and critically evaluate and appreciate the literature produces in old and middle ages.  Be acquainted with the major phases of the evolution of English language as well as the political and cultural history and aesthetic tradition of the Anglo-Saxon period and Middle age that shaped the contemporary literature in English.  Students will be able to analyze major works of old and Middle English and their representations of the human experience.  Students will be able to interpret old and middle English literary pieces within a historical and social context.  Students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of the major literary movements, figures and works in Medieval British Literature.

References

  • Poem analysis 1
  • Anglo Saxon Period
  • Poem Analysis 2
  • Poem Analysis 3

Objectives

  • To provide students with the knowledge of key linguistic terms, concepts and theories.
  • To equip students with the understanding of the origin, nature and development of human language.
  • To introduce students to the main sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic and neuro-linguistic elements and functions of language as a system.
  • To present to students the main role and function of linguistics in language teaching.
  • To provide students with a strong foundation in linguistic theories and make clear to them the relationship of these theories to language acquisition and teaching methodology.

Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, students will be able to define and demonstrate an understanding of central linguistic terms, concepts and theories.
  • They will be able to analyze linguistic concepts in terms of syntax, phonetics and semantics.
  • They will be able to identify and determine the structure and content of the lexicon and the nature of lexical entries
  • They will have ideas on the effects of society and culture on communication.
  • They will be able to apply various linguistic theories in English language teaching.
  • They will be able to apply linguistic features of learning of language and words in teaching.

References

  • Introduction to Linguistics
  • Introduction to Linguistics
  • The Study of Language 4th Edition
  • An Introductory Textbook of Linguistics and Phonetics
  • ELT Theory and Practice
  • Language and Linguistics The Key Concepts 2nd Edition
  • Linguistics

4th Semester

Objectives

  • The course comprises the following aims:  To ensure an informed critical entry of the students into the historical, social, political, cultural and religious, and philosophical contexts of the literary pieces of 16th and 17th century.  To inform the learners about the style and genre of different literary pieces taught in the course.  To develop the students’ literary skills of locating, evaluating and applying literariness.  To enhance the learners’ skills of explaining and appreciating the major works produces in 16th and 17th century.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of the course, the students will: • Be acquainted with, and therefore receive (enlightened) pleasure from reading and feeling the literature of the said period. • Perceive literariness and gain the ability to contextualize and critically evaluate and appreciate the poetry of 16th and 17th century • Gain adequate knowledge on various important texts and their authors belonging to the said time period and have the ability to infer their writing style. • Be able to contextualize the literary pieces by knowing the socio-political, literary and personal background. • Develop interdisciplinary skills and be able to compare and connect with the poetry of the 17th and 18th century with other literary and non-literary pieces. • Be able to evaluate and analyze how the socio-political elements of a particular society and time period may influence its literature.

References

  • Effortless English
  • BBC
  • Toastmasters
  • British Council

Objectives

  • The course, Eng- 2417: Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama, is designed with the following things in mind; a. To orient students with English plays at a deeper level. b. To help them learn how to read plays as academic work c. To help them grow consciousness about society and culture through reading plays along with getting pleasure

Outcomes

  • The major objective of this course is to orient and enlighten students about the basics of English literature except for poetry. By the end of this course, students will be able to:  Apply the gained knowledge to explain contemporary dynamics in Literature.  Fathom how a piece of work can reflect the nature of a socio-political incident.  Analyze the contemporary events from literary viewpoint.  Write a detailed paper on a particular play explaining from diverse perspectives

References

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Objectives

  • To provide the students with English skills needed in professional field
  • To develop students’ skills in working with frequently used workplace documents and genres in both traditional and electronic formats.
  • To enable students to create structurally effective, grammatically accurate and contextually appropriate documents.
  • To prepare the students as effective communicator for professional environment
  • To ensure grammatical accuracy and enable students to produce effective writing from evidence, and reader-centered business writing.

Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  • Demonstrate skills in working with frequently used workplace documents and genres in both traditional and electronic formats (e.g. business letters, emails, contemporary paper-based job application packages and online job applications, presentations – both in person and online)
  • Create structurally effective, grammatically accurate and contextually appropriate documents and communications. They will be able to demonstrate these skills working both independently and collaboratively
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the effects and importance of reader-centred writing, including writing to meet a defined, instrumental purpose
  • Demonstrate well-developed skills in writing an array of workplace documents and communications from evidence
  • Demonstrate skills in creating effective public presentations and/or mass communications (both/either in face-to-face classes or in online forums; both individually prepared and collaborative). Students will learn to consider “inclusiveness” in communication (meeting the needs of a variety of readers/auditors/spectators), and will demonstrate an awareness of inclusiveness in their work

References

  • Communication for Business, A Practical Approach by Shirly Taylor, 4th Edition
  • How to Write First-Class Business Correspondence, The handbook for business writing By L. Sue Baugh, Meridell Fryar and David A. Thomas
  • Effective Business Communication, Herta A Murphy and et al, McGraw-Hill, 1997
  • P D Chaturvedi and Mukesh Chaturvedi. Business Communication: concepts, Cases and Applications
  • New International Business English (Workbook), Leo Jones and et al, Cambridge University Press, 2001
  • Business Words: Essential Business English Vocabulary, Deirdre Howard-Williams and et al, Heinemann, 1992

Objectives

  • Course Objectives: The course aims to:  unfold the traditional approach to the analysis of English language.  familiarize students with the gradual development of the analyses of English language such as The Structural Grammar and the Transformational-Generative grammar.  critically examine how the construction of English sentences are analyzed in different approaches mentioned above.  introduce English grammatical categories and the basic elements of the language to the students.  enable students to break sentences into their component constituents.  introduce the structural approach to language analysis to the students  acquaint student with key constructs of the Transformational-Generative Grammar such as Deep structure vs. Surface structure, Government and Binding theories etc.

Outcomes

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References

  • Recommended reading 1. Quirk, R; Greenbaum,S Leech, G and Jan Svartvik, J. Longman Publications A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language 2. Palmer, F., Grammar, Penguin publishers 3. Celce-Mercia, M & Larsen-Freeman, D., (1983)The Grammar Book: An ESL / EFL Teacher’s Course, New Bury House Publishing, London 4. Giovani, M, Teaching Grammar, Structure and Meaning: Exploring Theory and Practice for Post-16 English Teachers 5. Fries, C, The Structures of English 6. Swan, M Practical English Usage 3rd Edition 7. Allen, S, Living English Structures. Longman 8. Crystal, D. & Fowler, H.W, A Dictionary of Modern English Usage 9. Jacobs, R.A. & Rosenbaum, English Transformational Grammar, Wiley Eastern Ltd

Objectives

  • Course Objective: The course has been designed basing on following objectives: a. To teach basic elements of Elementary French Language for writing and speaking correctly. b. To build the confidence of learners for doing communication in Elementary French speaking countries. c. To make them capable to do communication in different real life situations. Motivate students to learn Elementary French by showing its importance in various fields. d. To increase learners awareness and knowledge of the Elementary French community and culture all over the world.

Outcomes

  • French & Francophone and French Greetings

References

  • Tendance, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXz4yrkcTjg, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOq2H_TcdAU, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLMLTgEcSnU, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GuVMl3obeg,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXBpe98oTD0
  • Le Nouveau Taxi, Moi, je parle francais

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5th Semester

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6th Semester

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7th Semester

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8th Semester

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