Bachelor of Science in Information and Communication Engineering

Faculty: Faculty of Science & Technology (FST)

Department: Department of Information and Communication Technology

Program: Bachelor of Science in Information and Communication Engineering

General Info 

  •   Intake : Once in a Year.
  •   Application Duration :17 December 2023- 04 January 2024
  •   Method of Application : Online
  •   Course Duration : Years: 04, Semester: 08
  •   Total Credit Hours : 160
  •   Total Course Fee : 1,71,910.00 (Additional Fees if applicable)

Eligibility for Admission

 (1)    A candidate must pass SSC/ equivalent and HSC/ equivalent examination from Science discipline/ group as per national curriculum.

 

(2)   Candidates from Science Group must obtain GPA 5.00 in both SSC/ equivalent and HSC/ equivalent examination.

 

(3)    Candidates from General Certificate of Education (GCE) ‘O’ and ‘A’ level background must pass in minimum 05 (five) and 02 (two) subjects respectively having minimum 26.5 points in total after conversion based on the following scale:

 

A*-G Grading System (IGCSE)            9-1 Grading System (GCSE)

Grade

Point

Grade

Point

A*/A

5.00

9/8

5.00

B

4.00

7

4.50

C

3.50

6

4.00

D

3.00

5

3.50

 

 

4

3.00

 

Note: Gradings lower than 'D' or 4 (9-1 Grading System) will not be considered for point calculation.

 

(4)     Candidates from International Baccalaureate (IB) must pass in minimum 06 (six) subjects having minimum 30 points based on the rating scale used in their curriculum (7, 6, 5, 4). Rating of 1, 2 and 3 will not be considered in point calculation.

(5)    Candidates will have to sit for written test (MCQ) of 60 marks. Students opting to apply for ICE and/or CSE must have Mathematics and those opting to apply for ES must have Biology in HSC or equivalent as their compulsory/ optional subject (4th subject). Students opting to apply for all three departments (ICE, CSE & ES) must have both Mathematics and Biology in HSC or equivalent level.

 

(6) The marks distribution is as follows:

  • Sec-A: Mathematics- 20
  • Sec-B: Biology- 20
  • Sec-C: Physics -20
  • Sec-D:  Chemistry-20

           

Note:

  • Each candidate will appear exam on any three of the four sections.
  • Candidates opting for ICE/CSE must appear Sec-A.
  • Candidates opting for ES must appear Sec-B.

 

 

Admission Test Syllabus

  • Sec-A: Mathematics- 20
  • Sec-B: Biology- 20
  • Sec-C: Physics -20
  • Sec-D:  Chemistry-20

           

Weightage

     Total =100

  • (1) MCQ=55%
  • (2) HSC/Equivalent Result=25%
  • (3) SSC/Equivalent Result=20%

Exam Type:

  • Exam Type : MCQ (0.25 marks will be deducted for each wrong answer)
  • Written Test (MCQ): 20 January 2024 (10:00 AM- 11:00 AM)
  • MCQ Test Venues: Dhaka City,
  • Publication of the List of eligible candidates for Written Exam: 07January 2024 on BUP Website www.bup.edu.bd

Admit Cards can be downloaded and printed by the individual applicants from admission.bup.edu.bd from 14 January 2024 onward. But to avoid technical complication, applicants are requested to download the Admit Card as soon as possible

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  • 1. To achieve a basic idea on Object Oriented Programming Language 2. To present object-oriented aspects of C++ 3. To learn programming with C++

Outcomes

  • 1. Design object-oriented solutions for small systems/ problems, involving multiple objects. 2. Demonstrate good programming style and discuss the impact of style on developing and maintaining programs. 3. Identify the relative merits of different algorithmic designs, programming constructs and data structures. 4. Write code, test, document and prepare a professional looking package for specified systems / problems.

References

  • 1. Teach Yourself C++ by Herbert Schildt 2. Object Oriented Programming with C++ by E Balagurusamy 3. Complete Reference C++ by Herbert Schildt 4. Programming with C++ by Schaums Outline Series

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  • 1. To acquire the knowledge of Electromagnetic field theory that allows the student to have a solid theoretical foundation to be able in the future to design emission , propagation and reception of electro- magnetic wave systems. 2. To identify, formulate and solve fields and electromagnetic waves propagation problems in a multidisciplinary frame individually or as a member of a group. 3. To provide the students with a solid foundation in engineering fundamentals required to solve problems and to pursue higher studies

Outcomes

  • 1. To acquire the knowledge of Electromagnetic field theory that allows the student to have a solid theoretical foundation to be able in the future to design emission , propagation and reception of electro- magnetic wave systems. 2. To identify, formulate and solve fields and electromagnetic waves propagation problems in a multidisciplinary frame individually or as a member of a group. 3. To provide the students with a solid foundation in engineering fundamentals required to solve problems and to pursue higher studies

References

  • 1. Engineering Electromagnetics – W. H. Hayt Jr & John A. Buck; Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd. 2. Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics - Simon Ramo; John Wiley & Sons. 3. Fundamentals of Engineering Electromagnetic - D.K. Cheng; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd

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  • 1. To build web applications using ASP and client-side script technologies use with Microsoft's IIS. 2. To build XML applications with DTD and style sheets that span multiple domains ranging from finance to vector graphics to genealogy for use with legacy browsers.

Outcomes

  • 1. Analyze a web page and identify its elements and attributes. 2. Create web pages using XHTML and Cascading Styles sheets. 3. Build dynamic web pages using JavaScript (client side programming). 4. Write non-trivial programs using C#. 5. Build interactive web applications using ASP.NET and C#. 6. Build web applications using PHP. 7. Construct and manipulate web databases using ADO.NET. 8. Create XML documents. 9. Create XML Schema. 10. Build and consume web services

References

  • 1. “JavaScript A Beginner’s Guide”, John Pollock. 2. “Learning web Design”, Jennifer Niederst Robbins.

Objectives

  • The objectives of this course are to-  be familiar with the basic network architecture of Internet and Web.  perform basic website design using HTML and CSS.  introduced with the basic client-side programming using javascript.  introduced with the basic server-side programming using PHP.  deploy basic computer and network security measure to secure computing resources.  be familiar with the basic P2P technologies, Multimedia and web Applications, Search Engines, Directories and Semantic web.

Outcomes

  • This course will provide you with detailed knowledge of important technologies and application that are used in the domain of Internet and web technology. Due to the broad nature of this field, the course covers only selected topics, focussing first on some advanced topics in Internet technologies and then a selection of current and next-generation applications and services. Student will learn how the Internet works and how services and applications are provided to users of the Internet. This knowledge will help you in the design and management of computer networks, as well as development and execution of Internet applications. On successful completion of this course, students should be able to analyse a web page and identify its elements and attributes, create web pages using HTML and Cascading Styles sheets, build dynamic web pages and applications using JavaScript (client-side programming) and PHP (server-side programming), focusing fronted, back end, servers, clients and web databases.

References

  • Computer Networking: A Top Down Approach, Jim Kurose and Keith Ross (Comp Net. By KK)  Web Technologies: A Computer Science Perspective, by Jeffrey C. Jackson (Web Tec. by JJ)  “JavaScript A Beginner’s Guide”, John Pollock.  “Learning web Design”, Jennifer Niederst Robbins. Other References:  Computer Networking and the Internet, by Fred Halsall, Addison-Wesley publication.  Web Technology: Theory and Practice by M. Srinivasan, O'rally publication  Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS by Ian Lloyd, Sitepoint.

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  • 1. To implement some commonly used data structures 2. To implement some commonly used algorithms with required modifications based on requirements

Outcomes

  • 1. Be familiar with commonly used data structures and algorithms. 2. Apply required modification and optimization in any data structure and algorithm in common engineering design. 3. Illustrate important algorithmic design paradigms and methods of analysis.

References

  • 1. Introduction to Algorithms (Third Edition), Thomas H. Cormen 2. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in Cpp (Fourth Edition) – Mark Alan Weiss

Objectives

  • 1. To present an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) principles and approaches. 2. Develop a basic understanding of the building blocks ofAI as presented in terms of intelligent agents: Search, Knowledge representation, inference, logic, and learning.

Outcomes

  • Students should be able to: 1. Identify problems that are amenable to solution by AI methods, and which AI methods may be suited to solving a given problem. 2. Implement basic AI algorithms (e.g., standard search or constraint propagation algorithms)

References

  • 1. “Artificial Intelligence”, Stuart Russell, Peter Norvig 2. “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence”, Wolfgang Ertel 3. “Introducing Artificial Intelligence”, Henry Brighton and Howard Selina

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  • 1. Use transmission line analysis techniques. 2. Analyze waveguides structures propagating TE, TM or TEM modes, e.g., rectangular or circular waveguides, coaxial lines, surface wave lines, strip line, and microstrip lines. 3. Understand the concepts of microwave network analysis. 4. Design various impedance matching devices such as stub tuners and multi-stage quarter wave transformers 5. Analyze and design microwave resonators. 6. Design microwave power dividers and directional couplers.

Outcomes

  • 1. Gain knowledge and understanding of microwave analysis methods. 2. Be able to apply analysis methods to determine circuit properties of passive/active microwave devices. 3. Know how to model and determine the performance characteristics of a microwave circuit or system using computer aided design methods. 4. Have knowledge of basic communication link design; signal power budget, noise evaluation and link carrier to noise ratio. 5. Have knowledge of how transmission and waveguide structures and how they are used as elements in impedance matching and filter circuits.

References

  • 1. Microwave Devices and Circuits - Samuel Y. Liao; Prentice Hall of India. 2. Foundations for Microwave Engineering– E. Colliong; McGraw-Hill International. 3. Microwave Engineering - M.Pozar; Addision Wesley Publishing Company

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  • 1. To make students familier with fundamentals of mobile communication systems 2. To choose system (TDMA/FDMA/CDMA) according to the complexity, installation cost, speed of transmission, channel properties etc. 3. To identify the requirements of mobile communication as compared to static communication 4. To identify the limitations of 2G and 2.5G wireless mobile communication and use design of 3G and beyond mobile communication systems 5. As a prerequisite for the course in Wireless LANs

Outcomes

  • 1. To make students familiar with various generations of mobile communications 2. To understand the concept of cellular communication 3. To understand the basics of wireless communication 4. Knowledge of GSM mobile communication standard, its architecture, logical channels, advantages and limitations. 5. Knowledge of IS-95 CDMA mobile communication standard, its architecture, logical channels, advantages and limitations. 6. Knowledge of 3G mobile standards and their comparison with 2G technologies. 7. To under multicarrier communication systems. 8. To differentiate various Wireless LANs.

References

  • 1. "Mobile Communications Engineering: Theory and Applications"- Lee W.C.Y- McGraw-Hill 2. "Mobile Communications"-J. Schiller- Pearson Education Asia Ltd.

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  • 1. An understanding of basic Electronics on which analysis and design of electrical and electronic circuits and systems are based, including lumped circuit, digital and operational amplifier abstractions. 2. The capability to use abstractions to analyze and design simple electronic circuits. 3. An understanding of how complex devices such as semiconductor diodes and field-effect transistors are modeled and how the models are used in the design and analysis of useful circuits. 4. The capability to design and construct electronics circuits, take measurements of circuit behavior and performance, compare with predICEed circuit models and explain discrepancies.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will have a strong intuition and insight of the dynamics of electronic components like diodes, BJTs and JFETs, and Op-Amps which can be further used to design and optimize circuit performance. In addition, they will be able to perform:  Rectification of AC signal  Fixed and Self Biasing of BJT  Analyze Drain and Transfer characteristics of n-channel JFET  Mathematical operation using Op-Amp  Determination of frequency response curve of different types of filter by using Op-Amp

References

  •  Electronic Devices and Circuits, 3rd edition, David A. Bell  Electronic Principles, 5th edition, Albert Malvino and David Bates  Introductory Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, 9th edition, Robert L. Boylested, Loius Nashelsky  Principle of Electronics, 1st edition, V.K. Mehta, Rohit Mehta

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  • To present an introduction to database management systems, with an emphasis on how to organize, maintain and retrieve - efficiently, and effectively - information from a DBMS.
  • To present an introduction to database management systems, with an emphasis on how to organize, maintain and retrieve - efficiently, and effectively - information from a DBMS.

Outcomes

  • Describe the fundamental elements of relational database management systems
  • Explain the basic concepts of relational data model, entity-relationship model, relational database design, relational algebra and SQL.
  • Design ER-models to represent simple database application scenarios
  • Improve the database design by normalization.
  • Familiar with basic database storage structures and access techniques: file and page organizations, indexing methods including B tree, and hashing.
  • Describe the fundamental elements of relational database management systems
  • Explain the basic concepts of relational data model, entity-relationship model, relational database design, relational algebra and SQL
  • Design ER-models to represent simple database application scenarios
  • Convert the ER-model to relational tables, populate relational database and formulate SQL queries on data.
  • Improve the database design by normalization.
  • Familiar with basic database storage structures and access techniques: file and page organizations, indexing methods including B tree, and hashing

References

  • Silberschatz, A., Korth, H. F., & Sudarshan, S. (1997). Database system concepts (Vol. 4). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Objectives

  • • To familiarize the participant with the nuances of database environments towards an information-oriented data-processing oriented framework • To give a good formal foundation on the relational model of data • To present SQL and procedural interfaces to SQL comprehensively • To give an introduction to systematic database design approaches covering conceptual design, logical design and an overview of physical design • To motivate the participants to relate all these to one or more commercial product environments as they relate to the developer tasks • To present the concepts and techniques relating to query processing by SQL engines

Outcomes

  • After undergoing this laboratory module, the participant should be able to: • Understand, appreciate and effectively explain the underlying concepts of database technologies • Design and implement a database schema for a given problem-domain • Normalize a database • Populate and query a database using SQL DML/DDL commands. • Declare and enforce integrity constraints on a database using a state-of-the-art RDBMS

References

  • Database Systems- Design, Implementation, & Management

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  • The motivation behind this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of telecommunication networks from traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), through the emergence of data networks, local area networks, integrated services digital network (ISDN), broadband ISDN, development of fast packet switching, to the Internet. An overview of the architecture, technology, operation and analysis of networks for voice, data, and video applications along with the who’s who in Telco’s standardizations is also provided.

Outcomes

  • After completing this course, students will be familiar with the fundamental concepts of telecommunication systems, its different parts, switching networks and current state-of-the-art in this field.

References

  • 1) Telecommunication Switching Systems & Networks, Thiagarajan Viswanathan, Prentice-Hall, 1999 2) Data Communications & Networking, Behrouz A. Forouzan, TATA McGraw-Hill, 2nd edition. 3) Digital Telephony, John C. Bellamy, Wiley Interscience, 3rd edition 4) Communication networks, Alberto Leon-Garcia & Indra Widjaja, McGraw-Hill, 2000 5) Voice over IP Technologies, Mark A. Miller, Wiley-dreamtech, 2005 6) Digital Switching Systems - Syed R. Ali- McGraw Hill international. 7) Telephones and Telegraphy – S.F. Smith- Oxford University Press.

Objectives

  • 1. Learning basic concepts of Telecommunication System. 2. Knowing different digital modulation & demodulation techniques. 3. Understanding the basic concepts and structure of telecommunications networks for narrowband and broadband services, 4. Showing the basic principles of the modern telecommunication,. 5. Understanding the basic settings in the operation of telecommunications systems and devices

Outcomes

  • After the completion of Lab session students will be able to perform: 1. Ability to analyze the characteristics of the telephone systems. 2. Ability to define and distinguish digital and analog transmissions. 3. Ability to evaluate the digital services over analog carrier. 4. Ability to analyze the processes used in telecommunications.

References

  • 1. Digital Switching Systems - Syed R. Ali- McGraw Hill international. 2. Digital Telephony - John Bellamy- John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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  • 1.To understand the principles used in interfacing devices to computers and will gain a practical understanding of how those principles are put to use by manufacturers 2. To assign I/O addresses, IRQs, DMA channels, and other I/O related parameters in installing real equipment

Outcomes

  • 1. Design the interface between computer and the outside world 2. Explain the operation of interface between computer and the outside world 3. Relate the operation of various devices to interfacing 4. Define and explain IEEE-488, RS-232 and other buses 5. Examine various peripheral chips

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  • 1. To understand the basic concepts of web engineering 2. To know the configuration of web application platforms 3. To learn different web technologies like Java Servlets, JSPs, JavaScript, EJBs, etc. 4. To learn the implementation of different distributed web applications architecture 5. To understand different design patterns used for developing web applications 6. To know how to develop enterprise web applications

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References

  • Web Engineering

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  • 1.Gain a historical perspective of AI and its foundations. 2.Become familiar with basic principles of AI toward problem solving, inference, perception, knowledge representation, and learning. 3.Investigate applications of AI techniques in intelligent agents, expert systems, artificial neural networks and other machine learning models. 4.Experience AI development tools such as an ‘AI language’, expert system shell, and/or data mining tool. 5.Experiment with a machine learning model for simulation and analysis. 6.Explore the current scope, potential, limitations, and implications of intelligent systems. Course outcomes:

Outcomes

  • 1.Demonstrate fundamental understanding of the history of artificial intelligence (AI) and its foundations.Apply basic principles of AI in solutions that require problem solving, inference, perception, knowledge representation, and learning. 3.Demonstrate awareness and a fundamental understanding of various applications of AI techniques in intelligent agents, expert systems, artificial neural networks and other machine learning models. 4.Demonstrate proficiency developing applications in an 'AI language', expert system shell, or data mining tool. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in applying scientific method to models of machine learning. 6. Demonstrate an ability to share in discussions of AI, its current scope and limitations, and societal implications.

References

  • Artificial Intelligence -- a modern approach

Objectives

  • 1. Gain a historical perspective of AI and its foundations 2. Become familiar with basic principles of AI toward problem solving, inference, perception, knowledge representation, and learning. 3. Investigate applications of AI techniques in intelligent agents, expert systems, artificial neural networks and other machine learning models. 4. Experience AI development tools such as an ‘AI language’, expert system shell, and/or data mining tool. 5. Experiment with a machine learning model for simulation and analysis. 6. Explore the current scope, potential, limitations, and implications of intelligent systems.

Outcomes

  • 1.Demonstrate fundamental understanding of the history of artificial intelligence (AI) and its foundations. 2. Apply basic principles of AI in solutions that require problem solving, inference, perception, knowledge representation, and learning. 3. Demonstrate awareness and a fundamental understanding of various applications of AI techniques in intelligent agents, expert systems, artificial neural networks and other machine learning models. 4.Demonstrate profciency developing applications in an ’AI language’, expert system shell, or data mining tool. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in applying scientific method to models of machine learning 6. Demonstrate an ability to share in discussions of AI, its current scope and limitations, and societal implications.

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Objectives

  • The course will demonstrate the usefulness of Wireless communication which is a one of the most rapidly evolving fields in electrical engineering. Recent years have witnessed the expansion of wireless communication into every aspect of modern life including, among others, business, leisure, healthcare and transportation. In order to support this growth, communication systems have become more complex than ever and in accordance so have the tools required to design and analyze them. This course aims at introducing the students to some of the advanced methods for analysis of communication systems and the basic principles guiding their design. It will also provide an introduction to cooperative wireless communication, an emerging field promising to bring gains in terms of rate, coverage, reliability and energy-efficiency.

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  • 1. To teach study how information is measured in terms of probability and entropy, and the relationships among conditional and joint entropies. 2. To teach coding schemes, including error correcting codes. 3. Explain how this quantitative measure of information may be used in order to build efficient solutions to multitudinous engineering problems. 4. To teach coding schemes, including error correcting codes.

Outcomes

  • 1. Apply information theory and linear algebra in source coding and channel coding 2. Understand various error control encoding and decoding techniques 3. Analyze the performance of error control codes

References

  • 1. T. M. Cover and J. A. Thomas," Elements of Information Theory", John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1991 2. R. Hill, "A First Course in Coding Theory", Oxford University Press, 1986 3. D Costello, Error Control Coding

Objectives

  • Calculate the information content of a random variable from its probability distribution
  • relate the joint, conditional, and marginal entropies of variables in terms of their coupled probabilities
  • construct efficient codes for data on imperfect communication channels
  • generalise the discrete concepts to continuous signals on continuous channels
  • understand Fourier Transforms and the main ideas behind efficient algorithms for them
  • Various Channel coding

Outcomes

  • 1. Able to work with various source coding 2. Can design new source coding methods 3. Able to work with various channel coding 4. Can design new channel coding methods 5. Able to work with how discrete channels and measures of information generalize to their continuous forms

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Objectives

  • 1) Give an introduction about multimedia networks and applications 2) Learning multimedia information (text, images, audio & video) representation 3) Knowing text and image compression techniques 4) The basics of audio and video compression process 5) Get knowledge on standards for multimedia communications 6) Understand different transport protocols

Outcomes

  • 1) Able to understand the multimedia information representation such as text, images, audio & video. 2) Would be able to know the text and image compression techniques 3) Will understand the basics of audio and video compression process 4) Will know the standards for multimedia communications 5) Would be able understand different transport protocols

References

  • 1. Multimedia Communication by Fred Halsall 2. Multimedia by Robert Burnett, Anna Brunstrom 3. Wireless Multimedia Communication System by K.R. Rao

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  • The objective of this course is to address project management in the context of IT projects, including software projects. The concepts and use of project management tools, techniques and methodologies using the framework of project life cycle, the course covers various aspects pertaining to (i) project initiation, (ii) project planning and scheduling, (iii) project monitoring and control, and (iv) project termination.

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Objectives

  • 1) Learning basic concepts of an ICE Project Management, Methods, Frameworks 2) Knowing different SDLCs 3) Solve Organizational requirements through implementation of Project(s)

Outcomes

  • To know about ICE Project Management, Methods, Frameworks 2) Learning Organizational Project Requirements

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Objectives

  • 1. An understanding of basic Electronics on which analysis and design of electrical and electronic circuits and systems are based, including lumped circuit, digital and operational amplifier abstractions. 2. The capability to use abstractions to analyze and design simple electronic circuits. 3. An understanding of how complex devices such as semiconductor diodes and field-effect transistors are modeled and how the models are used in the design and analysis of useful circuits. 4. The capability to design and construct electronics circuits, take measurements of circuit behavior and performance, compare with predICEed circuit models and explain discrepancies.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will have a strong intuition and insight of the dynamics of electronic components like diodes, BJTs and JFETs, and Op-Amps which can be further used to design and optimize circuit performance. In addition, they will be able to perform:  Rectification of AC signal  Fixed and Self Biasing of BJT  Analyze Drain and Transfer characteristics of n-channel JFET  Mathematical operation using Op-Amp  Determination of frequency response curve of different types of filter by using Op-Amp

References

  •  Electronic Devices and Circuits, 3rd edition, David A. Bell  Electronic Principles, 5th edition, Albert Malvino and David Bates  Introductory Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, 9th edition, Robert L. Boylested, Loius Nashelsky  Principle of Electronics, 1st edition, V.K. Mehta, Rohit Mehta

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Outcomes

  • After completing this course, students will be familiar with the fundamental concepts of telecommunication systems, its different parts, switching networks and current state-of-the-art in this field.

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Objectives

  • 1. To define the different parameter and concepts of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics. 2. To explain the basic concepts of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics. 3. To solve analytical problems regarding Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics.

Outcomes

  • 1. Apply different basic parameters in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as periodic motion, simple harmonic motion, undamped oscillations, interference, diffraction, polarization and prism, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, matter-wave, atomic model, radioactive decay, fusion, fission etc. 2. Explain different basic theories in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as the wave motion for different systems along with energy, different formula for interference, diffraction, polarization special theory of relativity, Compton theory, nuclear transformation, and nuclear reaction etc. 3. Solve quantitative problems in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as energy of wave motion, wavelength, diffraction pattern, relativistic energy, photon energy, Compton shift, nuclear binding energy etc. 4. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on computer graphics.

References

  • 2. Fundamentals of Physics (10th) - Halliday, Resnick, and Walker 3. Physics for Scientists and Engineers(9th) - Serway and Jewett 4. Concept of Modern Physics (6th) - Arthur Beiser 5. University Physics with Modern Physics (14th) - Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman 6. Modern Physics for Science and Engineering - Marshall L. Burns 7. Waves and Oscillations - Walter Fox Smith 8. The Physics of Vibrations and Waves - H. J. Pain 9. Waves and Oscillations (2nd)- BrijLal and Subramannyam 10. Fundamental of Optics - Francis A. Jenkins and Harvey E.White 11. Introduction to Modern Optics - Grant R. Fowles 12. Fundamental Optical Design - Michael J. Kidger

Objectives

  • The objectives of this course are to: a. provide the basic concepts of differential and integral calculus, especially for the students of Science and Engineering. b. stimulate students to solve diverse problems in the field of calculus with real life situations. c. study and analyze of the behavior of limits, derivatives and integrals. d. gain proficiency in calculus computations e. use tools to solve application of calculus in science and practical problems.

Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, students should be able to: a. know the use of differential calculus and integral calculus in various field b. use computational tools to solve problems of differential and integral calculus c. identify, analyze and subsequently solve physical situations whose behavior can be described by calculus d. increase the knowledge of calculus and developed the skill to computation e. apply mathematical skills in engineering applications and real-world using calculus

References

  • 1. Calculus: Howard Anton, Irl Bivens, Stephen Davis, 10th edition 2. Differential & Integral Calculus – Das and Mukhajee, 54th edition

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Objectives

  • a) Analyze the operation of LEDs, laser diodes, and PIN photo detectors (spectral properties, bandwidth, and circuits) and apply in optical systems. b) Explain the principles of, compare and contrast single- and multi-mode optical fiber characteristics. c) Analyze and design optical communication and fiber optic sensor systems. d) Locate, read, and discuss current technical literature dealing with optical fiber systems.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will be able to: a. Recognize and classify the structures of Optical fiber and types. b. Discuss the channel impairments like losses and dispersion. c. Analyze various coupling losses. d. Classify the Optical sources and detectors and to discuss their principle. e. Familiar with Design considerations of fiber optic systems. f. To perform characteristics of optical fiber, sources and detectors, design as well as conduct experiments in software and hardware, analyze the results to provide valid conclusions

References

  • 4.1 Text books: a. Optical Communication, Principles and Practice- J. Senior- Prentice Hall. 4.2 Reference books a. Optical Communication System - J. Gowar- Prentice Hall b. Optical Fiber Communication - G. Keiser-McGraw-Hill International

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Objectives

  • To provide students with a good knowledge of enterprises and markets, with specific competences in the field of statistics and computer sciences.  To help the students learn statistical tools, which are used in information and communication Engineering  To interpret and solve science-related problems from engineering perspective.  To provide the concept of probability theory, random variables, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing.

Outcomes

  • 1. Organize, present and interpret statistical data, both numerically and graphically 2. Use various methods to compute the probabilities of events 3. Analyze and interpret statistical data using appropriate probability distributions 4. Recognize the role of and application of probability theory, descriptive and inferential statistics in many different fields. 5. Interpret and communicate the results of statistical analyses, orally and in writing.

References

  • 3.1 Text books: 1. Statistics and Probability - Spiegel (Schaum Series, 8th edition); McGraw-Hill. 2. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (3rd edition)- Sheldon M. Ross 3.2 Reference Books: 1. Probability and Statistics for Engineers (7th edition)-Richard A. Johnson 2. Probability and Random Processes - Henry Stark & John W. woods- Pearson Education. 3. Business Statistics - M.P. Gupta and S.P. Gupta; Sultan Chand and Sons. 4. Probability, Random variables and Stochastic Processes – Papuolis- McGraw-Hill Higher Education. 5. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (7th edition)- Walpole 6. Introduction to Probability Models (6th edition)- Sheldon M. Ross

Objectives

  • The objectives of this course are to:  develop an elementary and fundamental knowledge in ordinary and partial differential equations, especially for the students of Science and Engineering.  Stimulate students to solve diverse problems in the field of ordinary and partial differential equations with real life situations.  Appreciate the importance of numerical methods in solving ordinary and partial differential equations.  study engineering problems in growth, decay, flow, spring and electronic circuits using ordinary and partial differential equations.

Outcomes

  • On successful completion of this course, students should be able to: 1. Apply the fundamental concepts of Ordinary Differential Equations and Partial Differential Equations and the basic numerical methods for their resolution. 2. Understand the difficulty of solving problems analytically and the need to use numerical approximations for their resolution. 3. Use computational tools to solve problems and applications of Ordinary Differential Equations and Partial Differential Equations. 4. Formulate and solve differential equation problems in the field of Industrial Organization Engineering. 5. Identify, analyze and subsequently solve physical situations whose behavior can be described by ordinary and partial differential equations

References

  • Text books: 1. Ordinary and Partial differential Equations – M. D. Raisenghania (MDR) Other References: 1. Schaum's Outline of Partial Differential Equations: Paul Du Chateau and D. Zachmann 2. Differential Equations – M. L. Khanna. 3. Differential Equations – Shepley L.Ross 4. Differential Equations – B. D. Sharma. 5. Differential Equations – P. N. Chatterjee. 6. A text book on of coordinate geometry with vector analysis- Rahman and Bhattachrjee.
  • Text books: 1. Ordinary and Partial differential Equations – M. D. Raisenghania (MDR) Other References: 1. Schaum's Outline of Partial Differential Equations: Paul Du Chateau and D. Zachmann 2. Differential Equations – M. L. Khanna. 3. Differential Equations – Shepley L.Ross 4. Differential Equations – B. D. Sharma. 5. Differential Equations – P. N. Chatterjee. 6. A text book on of coordinate geometry with vector analysis- Rahman and Bhattachrjee.

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Objectives

  • The objective of this course is to develop students’ understanding of accounting, accounting process and application of conceptual framework for the same, in order to develop their abilities to complete the Accounting Cycle.The course is aimed to focuses on to describe what managers do and why they need accounting information; to give ideas about cost terms, concepts and classifications; to explain the importance of cost behaviour and their relationship with managerial decision making; to give elementary idea about budgets and budgetary control; to discuss various methods of segment performance measurement and to to introduce techniques of generating relevant information for decision making.

Outcomes

  • After studying this course, students should be able to: 1. Prepare financial statements in accordance with Accounting Principles. 2. Explain the differences between management and financial accounting 3. Describe the main elements of financial accounting information – assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses

References

  • 1. Weygandt, J., Kieso, D., & Kimmel, P. (2019). Accounting principles. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Garrison, R., Brewer, P., & Noreen, E. (2015). Introduction to Managerial accounting.7th Edition, New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

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Objectives

  • The motivation behind this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the evolution of telecommunication networks from traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), through the emergence of data networks, local area networks, integrated services digital network (ISDN), broadband ISDN, development of fast packet switching, to the Internet. An overview of the architecture, technology, operation and analysis of networks for voice, data, and video applications along with the who’s who in Telco’s standardizations is also provided.

Outcomes

  • After completing this course, students will be familiar with the fundamental concepts of telecommunication systems, its different parts, switching networks and current state-of-the-art in this field.

References

  • 1) Telecommunication Switching Systems & Networks, Thiagarajan Viswanathan, Prentice-Hall, 1999 2) Data Communications & Networking, Behrouz A. Forouzan, TATA McGraw-Hill, 2nd edition. 3) Digital Telephony, John C. Bellamy, Wiley Interscience, 3rd edition 4) Communication networks, Alberto Leon-Garcia & Indra Widjaja, McGraw-Hill, 2000 5) Voice over IP Technologies, Mark A. Miller, Wiley-dreamtech, 2005 6) Digital Switching Systems - Syed R. Ali- McGraw Hill international. 7) Telephones and Telegraphy – S.F. Smith- Oxford University Press.

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References

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Objectives

  • To develop logical thinking and its application to computer science (to emphasize the importance of proving statements correctly and de-emphasize the hand-waving approach towards correctness of an argument). The subject enhances one’s ability to reason and ability to present a coherent and mathematically accurate argument. About 40% of the course time will be spent on logic and proofs and remaining 60% of the course time will be devoted to functions, relations, etc.

Outcomes

  • 1. Use logical notation to define and reason about fundamental mathematical concepts such as sets, relations, functions, and integers. 2. Evaluate elementary mathematical arguments and identify fallacious reasoning (not just fallacious conclusions). 3. Prove elementary properties of modular arithmetic and explain their applications in Computer Science, for example, in cryptography and hashing algorithms. 4. Apply graph theory models of data structures and state machines to solve problems of connectivity and constraint satisfaction, for example, scheduling. 5. Apply the method of invariants and well-founded ordering to prove correctness and termination of processes and state machines. 6. Calculate numbers of possible outcomes of elementary combinatorial processes such as permutations and combinations. 7. Calculate probabilities and discrete distributions for simple combinatorial processes; calculate expectations. 8. Demonstrate different traversal methods for trees and graphs. 9. Model problems in Computer Science using graphs and trees. 10. Problem solve and study in a small team with fellow students

References

  • 1. Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, Seventh Edition by Kenneth H. Rosen. 2. Discrete Mathematics, Fifth Edition, by Kenneth A. Ross 3. Discrete Mathematics with Applications, Fourth Edition by Susanna S. Epp

Objectives

  • This course is intended students using mathematics at a high level in theoretical physics, engineering and information Engineering. The objectives of this course are to Introduce students to the fundamentals of vector and expose students to mathematical application of vector to handle diverse problems which occur in real life situations. It also covers the preliminary ideas of complex variables and explore the knowledge of applications. It stimulates the science students to understand the real-life problems of vector analysis and complex variables.

Outcomes

  • • Learning vector analysis concepts. • Learning Complex Analysis concepts. • To improve the knowledge about Vector and Complex Analysis. • To improve the knowledge about practical application of vector analysis, as well as Complex Analysis.

References

  • Text Books: 2.1 Theory and Problems of Vector Analysis – Murray R. Spiegel (Schaum’s Outline series). 2.2 Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Complex Variables– Murray R. Spiegel Reference Books: 1. Theory and Problems of Vector Analysis – Murray R. Spiegel (Schaum’s Outline series). 2. Vector Analysis – M. D. Raisinghania. 3. Vector Analysis – Dr. Muhammad Abdus Sattar. 4. Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Complex Variables– Murray R. Spiegel 5. Theory of functions of a Complex Variables – Shanti Narayan.

Objectives

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Outcomes

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References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

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References

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Objectives

  • Main objective of the course is to teach fundamental concepts in economics to prepare student of ICE so that they can apply their acquired knowledge in making decision regarding ICT project

Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of the course student will be able to:  Understand core economic terms, concepts, and theories;Understand nature of demand and supply;Understand behavior of consumer and producer; Understand different kinds of markets and how they function;Understand How the macroeconomy works;Interpret, analyze, and even predict macroeconomic issues in the very long run and the short run;Apply economic tools in engineering decision making

References

  • 1. Samuelson, P. A. and W. D. Nordhaus (2004). Economics, 18th Edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2. Mankiw, G. N. (2012). Macroeconomics, 8h Edition, Worth Publishers, Inc. 3. Fundamentals of Engineering Economics- Chan S. Park, Pearson Prentice Hall. 4. Engineering Economy- Blank and Tarquin-McGraw-Hill

Objectives

  • Introduce the concept of digital and binary systems 2. Be able to design and analyze combinational logic circuits. 3. Be able to design and analyze sequential logic circuits. 4. Understand the basic software tools for the design and implementation of digital circuits and systems.

Outcomes

  • 1. Able to perform the conversion among different number systems; Familiar with baisc logic gates-AND, OR & NOT, XOR, XNOR; Independently or work in team to build simple logic circuits using basic. 2. Understand Boolean algebra and basic properties of Boolean algebra; able to simplify simple Boolean functions by using the basic Boolean properties. 3. Able to design simple combinational logics using baisc gates. Able to optimize simple logic using Karnaugh maps, understand "don't care". 4. Familiar with basic sequential logic components: SR Latch, D Flip-Flop and their usage and able to analyze sequential logic circuits.

References

  • 1. Digital Logic and Computer Design- M Morris Mano; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd. 2. Digital Fundamentals - Floyd; Prentice Hall International, Inc. 3. Pulse, Digital and Switching waveforms - Jacob Millman& Herbert Taub; Tata McGraw- Hill. 4. Electric Circuits Analysis and Design – Nicholas L.Pappas. 5. Digital Electronics: Principles, Devices and Applications- Anil K. Maini 6. Fundamentals of Logic Design, C. H. Roth, Jr. and L. L. Kinney 7. Digital Electronics: A Practical Approach with VHDL, William Kleitz

Objectives

  • Introduce the concept of digital and binary systems 2. Be able to design and analyze combinational logic circuits. 3. Be able to design and analyze sequential logic circuits. 4. Understand the basic software tools for the design and implementation of digital circuits and systems.

Outcomes

  • 1. Able to perform the conversion among different number systems; Familiar with baisc logic gates-AND, OR & NOT, XOR, XNOR; Independently or work in team to build simple logic circuits using basic. 2. Understand Boolean algebra and basic properties of Boolean algebra; able to simplify simple Boolean functions by using the basic Boolean properties. 3. Able to design simple combinational logics using baisc gates. Able to optimize simple logic using Karnaugh maps, understand "don't care". 4. Familiar with basic sequential logic components: SR Latch, D Flip-Flop and their usage and able to analyze sequential logic circuits

References

  • 1. Digital Logic and Computer Design- M Morris Mano; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd. 2. Digital Fundamentals - Floyd; Prentice Hall International, Inc. 3. Pulse, Digital and Switching waveforms - Jacob Millman& Herbert Taub; Tata McGraw- Hill. 4. Electric Circuits Analysis and Design – Nicholas L.Pappas. 5. Digital Electronics: Principles, Devices and Applications- Anil K. Maini 6. Fundamentals of Logic Design, C. H. Roth, Jr. and L. L. Kinney 7. Digital Electronics: A Practical Approach with VHDL, William Kleitz

Objectives

  • The purposes of this course are to instruct the learners about the presentation skills and public speaking skills. Efeective presentations and public speaking skills are important in business, training, teaching, lecturing, and generally feeling comfort in a public gatheing or in a formal setting.Developing the capability and confidence to deliver good presentation before the audience is undoubtedly a competency.The formats and purposes of presentations can be different for example, oral (spoken), multimedia (using various media- visual, audio, etc), powerpoint presentations, long planned presentations, educational or training sessions, lectures and simply giving a talk on a subject to a group on a voluntary basis.

Outcomes

  • • Understand the techniques of academic reading and become familiar with technical terms and develop competency in academic reading, preparing report written communication/ presentation. • Analyze any problem critically, analyze and interpret data and synthesize information to provide valid conclusions. • Communicate effectively within the shortest possible time to present their reports and academic writings. • Apply the techniques to find out the main points of any long article within a very limited time as well as know the techniques of any effective writing.

References

  • 1. Business correspondent & Report wrting-R. C Sharma & Krisna Mohan 2. The Most Common Mistakes in English Usage-T. E Berry 3. A Practical English Grammar- A Thomas, A V Martinet 4. Prose of Our Time –ahasanul Haque, Serajul Isalm Choudhury & M Shamsuddoha

Objectives

  • The course has been designed basing on following objectives: a. To teach basic elements of Elementary French Language for writing and speaking correctly. b. To build the confidence of learners for doing communication in Elementary French speaking countries. c. To make them capable to do communication in different real life situations. d. Motivate students to learn Elementary French by showing its importance in various fields. e. To increase learners awareness and knowledge of the Elementary French community and culture all over the world.

Outcomes

  • a) Maintain social contact in different social situations, greet people, b) using French expressions for day-to-day life c) Introduce themselves and others d) Ask information about a person. e.g. ( name, age, nationality, profession, address, telephone number etc) e) Speak about their likings and preferences f) Write letters to new Francophone friends with self and family description g) Describe, show and locate objects; describe bedrooms, apartment etc h) Describe a person (physique, clothes, colours etc.) i) Converse with seller, asking price, likings, size etc j) Describe house, rooms, apartment; locate places, rooms in a layout k) Listen to and understand French used in different social / daily situation l) Read and understand texts at a reasonably beginners level m) Write effectively ( email, descriptive letter, completing form etc) n) Speak with moderate pronunciation and accuracy respecting social language

References

  • 1. Le Nouveau Taxi-1 méthode de français by Guy Capelle & Robert 2. French Dictionary. 3. Cahier d’exercices of Taxi -1.

Objectives

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References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • 1. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to— • Examine various aspects of ICT laws, cybercrimes and practices. 2. Develop a clear understanding on issues and practices governing the current cyber legal regime. 3. Assess the social, cultural and economic implications of online freedoms and thereby understand the need to reinforce ethical issues in current digital civic space. 4. Identify current cyber legal restrictions and its uses and practices. 5. Examine the importance of security and identification threats and associated legal protections etc. 6. Analyze the ethical aspects and necessities of cyber laws and their implications.

Outcomes

  • 1. Students will be able to learn a variety of ethical frameworks, privacy, intelligence property and relate them to arising ethical issues in cyberspace 2. Students will be able to address system security issues and their impact on individuals, organizations, and society 3. Students will learn the basic concepts in comput

References

  • 1. Information & Communication Technology (ICT) Act 2006 2. Digital Security Act 2018 3. Pornography Control Act 2012 4. Telecommunication Act 2001 5. Copyright Act 2000 6. Code of ACM 7. ISACA, Code of Professional Ethics 8. UNCITRAL Model Laws 9. Alfreda Dudley, James Braman, Giovanni Vincenti, Investigating Cyber Law and Cyber Ethics: Issues, Impacts and Practices, IGI Global, 2011 10. Lloyd, Ian J. Information Technology Law. Oxford University Press, 2017. 11. Schmitt, Michael N., ed. Tallinn manual 2.0 on the international law applicable to cyber operations. Cambridge University Press, 2017. 12. Dr. Zulfiquar Ahmed, A Text Book on Cyber Law in

Objectives

  • This course introduces the basic techniques of mathematics such as matrix algebra, Fourier analysis and so on. These mathematical tools are of a variety of uses especially in the field of information and communication Engineering. The main purpose of this course is to enable science students to use mathematics in analyzing engineering theories.

Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able 1. To develop an understanding of the core ideas and concepts of matrix algebra 2. To help the students enlarge the ability to solve problems using matrix and establish an information Engineering framework. 3. To expose students about Fourier analysis and its application in different physical sciences

References

  • 1. Theory and Problems of Linear Algebra- Seymour Lipschutz, (Schaum’s Outline series). 2. Martices and Linear Transformations – Mohammad Iman Ali. 3. An Introduction to Matrices – S. C. Gupta. 4. Matrics – FrandAsyres, JR. 5. The Laplace Transform: Theory and Applications - Joel L. Schiff 6. Laplace Transforms: Murray R. Spiegel (Schaum’s Outline) 7. Fourier Series & Boundary Value Problems- James Ward Brown & Ruel V. Churchill 8. Fourier Series & Fourier Transforms and Their Applications-dr. J.K. Goyal & K.P. Gupta 9. Schaum's Outline of Fourier Analysis with Applications to Boundary Value Problems

Objectives

  • To solve problems using data structures such as linear lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, heaps, binary search trees, and graphs and writing programs for these solutions.

Outcomes

  • Formulate new solutions for programing problems or improve existing code using learned algorithms and data structures evaluate algorithms and data structures in terms of time and memory complexity of basic operations.

References

  • • “Theory and Problems of Data Structures”, Seymour Lipschutz, Schaum's Outlines, latestEdition.

Objectives

  • Assess how the choice of data structures and algorithm design methods impacts the performance of programs.
  • Choose the appropriate data structure and algorithm design method for a specified application.
  • Write programs using modular programming as well as object oriented programming paradigm.
  • Solve problems using data structures such as linear lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, heaps, tournament trees, binary search trees, and graphs and writing programs for these solutions.
  • Solve problems using algorithm design methods such as the greedy method, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, backtracking, and branch and bound and writing programs for these solutions.
  • Assess how the choice of data structures and algorithm design methods impacts the performance of programs.
  • Choose the appropriate data structure and algorithm design method for a specified application.
  • Write programs using modular programming as well as object oriented programming paradigm.
  • Solve problems using data structures such as linear lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, heaps, tournament trees, binary search trees, and graphs and writing programs for these solutions.
  • Solve problems using algorithm design methods such as the greedy method, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, backtracking, and branch and bound and writing programs for these solutions.

Outcomes

  • After completing this course, the students will be able to write program with specific data structures such as linear lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, heaps, trees, binary search trees, and graphs.
  • After completing this course, the students will be able to write program with specific data structures such as linear lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, binary trees, heaps, trees, binary search trees, and graphs.

References

  • Programming Exercises
  • Data Structure Basics
  • Important Algorithms to know
  • Programming Exercises
  • Data Structure Basics
  • Important Algorithms to know

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the basic principles of communication system. 2. To learn mathematical background for communication signal analysis. 3. To understand and analyze the signal flow in a communication system. 4. To analyze error performance of a digital communication system in presence of noise and other interferences. 5. To understand concept of spread spectrum communication system.

Outcomes

  • After successfully completing the course students will be able to Analyze the basics of Analog & Digital Communication System. Students will learn about source, transmitter, transmission channel, receiver etc. of communication model. Students will be able to know about different types of modulation schemes. Various types of multiplexing & multiple access techniques will be covered.

References

  • Communication System - Simon Haykin- John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the basic principles of communication system. 2. To learn mathematical background for communication signal analysis. 3. To understand and analyze the signal flow in a communication system. 4. To analyze error performance of a digital communication system in presence of noise and other interferences. 5. To understand concept of spread spectrum communication system.

Outcomes

  • 1. To understand and compare different digital modulation schemes. 2. To understand the design tradeoffs and performance of communications systems. 3. To learn about practical communication systems.

References

  • Communication System - Simon Haykin- John

Objectives

  • Course Objectives: The subject aims to provide the student with: a. Signals classification and representation of signals. b. System classification - Time domain analysis of LTI system. c. An understanding of Frequency domain analysis of LTI systems

Outcomes

  • 1. Characterize and analyze the properties of CT and DT signals and systems 2. Analyze CT and DT systems in Time domain using convolution 3. Represent CT and DT systems in the Frequency domain using Fourier Analysis tools like CTFS, CTFT, DTFS and DTFT. 4. Conceptualize the effects of sampling a CT signal 5. Analyze CT and DT systems using Laplace transforms and Z Transforms.

References

  • 1. Continues and Discrete Signals and Systems- by S.S. Soliman & M. D. Srinath; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd. 2. Continuous-Time Signals and Systems- by Michael D. Adams. 3. Signals and Systems (2nd Edition) 2nd Edition by Alan V. Oppenheim (Author), Alan S. Willsky 4. Digital Signal Processing, Principles, Algorithms and Applications (3rd Edition) - by John G. Proakis & Dimitris G. Manolakis

Objectives

  • To introduce the fundamentals of numerical methods used for the solution of engineering problems
  • To improve the computer programming skills of the students.
  • To provide appropriate and useful methods for obtaining approximate numerical results of the problems.
  • To solve problems in the field of Applied Mathematics and Engineering that requires the computation of numerical results using raw data.
  • To solve complex mathematical problems with arithmetic operations by formulating mathematical models of physical situations
  • To deal with various topics, such as, basic matrix operations; regression analysis; solutions of systems equations; determination of roots by different methods; curve fitting; Numerical integration and differentiation; Data interpolation etc.

Outcomes

  • Students will be able to understand basics of numerical analysis and its application in the field of Science and Engineering.
  • Students will be able to apply numerical methods to obtain approximate solutions to engineering problems
  • Students will be able to learn computer programming with numerical packages, such as MATLAB.
  • Students will be able to write efficient, well-documented Matlab code and present numerical results in an informative way.
  • Students will be able to apply numerical methods for various mathematical operations and tasks, such as regression, the solution of linear and nonlinear equations; root finding; differentiation, integration, curve fitting and interpolation.
  • Students will be able to analyze and evaluate the accuracy of common numerical methods used for solving different engineering problems.

References

  • Lab Manual
  • Chapra, S. C., Applied Numerical Methods with MATLAB for Engineers and Scientists, McGraw-Hill, 2005.
  • Todd Young and Martin J. Mohlenkamp, “Introduction to Numerical Methods and Matlab Programming for Engineers”
  • Brian H. Hahn and Daniel T. Valentine, “Essential MATLAB for Engineers and Scientists”

Objectives

  • 1. To learn and understand fundamentals of computer network To learn and understand network architectures, protocols and applications 2. To learn and understand network architectures, protocols and applications

Outcomes

  • 1.Build implementations of the Internet protocols 2.Understand the Internet protocols 3.Generalize this knowledge to other networking protocols. 4.Think like a networking practitioner 5.Read and judge articles on networking in trade magazines 6. Begin to read and judge research and technical articles on networking 7.Create simplicity and reliability out of complexity and unreliability

References

  • 1. Tanenbaum A., “Computer Networks”, 5th Edition, 2010 2. Fourauzan B., “Data Communications and Networking”, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2012.

Objectives

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Outcomes

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References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • It is aimed to teach various selected models, tools, notations and validation techniques for the analysis and specification of system requirements that will enable the students to apply these in subsequent projects and work experiences

Outcomes

  • Students will be able to: 1. Understand the basics of Requirements Engineering 2. Prepare for, and undertake the requirements elicitation tasks 3. Analyse client needs 4. Create models of requirements using a variety of notations and techniques

References

  • 1. Carlo Ghezzi, Mehdi Jazayeri, Dino Mandrioli; Fundamentals of Software Engineering; 2nd edition; Pearson Education Asia 2. Pressman R.S.; Software engineering - A practitioner's approach; 5th edition; McGraw Hill Higher education series. 3. Mall R.; Fundamentals of Software Engineering; Prentice Hall of India 4. Behferooz A. &Gydsib F.J.; Software Engineering fundamentals; Oxford University Press. 5. Jalote P.; An Integrated approach to Software Engineering; Narosa 6. Ian Sommervillie; Software Engineering, Pearson Education Asia

Objectives

  • Provide users with a ready-to-use, expressive visual modeling language so they can develop and exchange meaningful models.
  • Provide extensibility and specialization mechanisms to extend the core concepts.
  • Provide extensibility and specialization mechanisms to extend the core concepts.
  • Be independent of particular programming languages and development processes.
  • Support higher-level development concepts such as collaborations, frameworks, patterns and components
  • Integrate best practices.

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • Software Engineering‖
  • An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering‖

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

  • No outcome found!

References

  • No reference found!

Objectives

  • No objective found!

Outcomes

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References

  • No reference found!

1st Semester

Objectives

  • 1. To describe algorithms and solve problems using computers. 2. To know about various syntax, semantics of structured programming languages. 3. To develop basic programming skills with respect to program design and development.

Outcomes

  • 1. Apply information and concepts of variables, functions, control structure, loop, conditional logic, files, etc. to solve competitive programming problems and develop effective solutions. 2. Analyze the fundamental principles, typical characteristics, and mechanisms of a structured programming language. 3. Develop basic programming skills with respect to program design and development. 4. Develop communication skill by presenting topics on Structured programming Language.

References

  • 1. Teach Yourself C (3rd Edition) by Herbert Schidlt 2. Programming in Ansi C (6th Edition) by E Balagurusamy 3. C: The Complete Reference (4th Edition) by Herbert Schildt 4. C Programming Language (2nd Edition) by Dennis M. Ritche

Objectives

  • 1. To learn basic ideas of programming languages. 2. To learn how to program with C. 3. To learn how to think about the problems, their solutions and translating it to programming language.

Outcomes

  • 1. Compare algorithms and solve problems using computers. 2. Assess the fundamental principles, typical characteristics and mechanisms of a structured programming language practically. 3. Apply practical knowledge to develop basic programming skills with respect to program design and development.

References

  • . Teach Yourself C (3rd Edition) by Herbert Schidlt 2. Programming in Ansi C (6th Edition) by E Balagurusamy 3. C: The Complete Reference (4th Edition) by Herbert Schildt 4. C Programming Language (2nd Edition) by Dennis M. Ritche

Objectives

  • 1. Create a foundation of basic electrical engineering and circuits. 2. Familiarize students with basic circuit laws (Ohm, Kirchhoff), techniques (Mesh, Nodal), concepts (Superposition, Source Transformation) and theorems (Thevenin, Norton). 3. Develop the understanding of AC steady state response of single-phase circuits and power in AC circuits. 4. Introduce students to poly-phase circuits as a practical arena of AC Circuits.

Outcomes

  • 1.Capable to interpret circuit laws and apply their corresponding technique to find circuit quantities; also justify selection particular circuit concept(s) and theorem(s) for simplifying complex circuits. 2. Competent in analyse 1st and 2nd-order circuits and evaluate the responses both in the presence and absence of dc circuits. 3. Manage to outline sinusoids and phasors in explaining circuit parameters and analysing AC power. 4. Able to understand the current voltage relation of 3 phase circuits for different configurations and reproduce knowledge of AC power to analyze real life power consumptions of transmission lines.

References

  • 1. Fundamentals of Electric Circuit by C. K. Alexander & M. N. Sadiku 2. Introductory Circuit Analysis by R. L. Boylsted 3. Alternating Current Circuits by G. S. Corcoran & R. F. Kerchner 4. Electric Circuits by J. A. Edminister 5. Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis by J. D. Irwin & R. M. Nelms Electric Circuits by James William Nilsson

Objectives

  • 1. To enable the students to apply the fundamental circuit laws (KVL, KCL, Ohm’s law) in hardware domain. 2. To develop students’ skills to simplify complex electrical circuits into simpler circuits by Thevenin and Norton’s theorem and verify them in hardware. 3. To teach the students the basic operation of oscilloscope to measure AC quantities (magnitude and phase). 4. To impart the students the skills of analogue filter design by RLC circuit. 5. To familiarize the students with implementation of hardware electrical projects and a circuit simulation software (Proteus)

Outcomes

  • 1. Assemble electrical circuits that can verify fundamental electrical laws (KVL, KCL and Ohm’s Law). 2. Set up circuits to justify Thevenin’s law and Norton’s law in electrical circuits. 3. Produce desired ac waves and measure amplitude and phase of ac waves in oscilloscope, design analogue RLC filter that can produce desired frequency response. 4. Develop collaborating nature by completing a simple project in both software and hardware and performing group activities.

References

  • 1. Fundamentals of Electric Circuit by C. K. Alexander & M. N. Sadiku 2. Introductory Circuit Analysis by R. L. Boylsted 3. Alternating Current Circuits by G. S. Corcoran & R. F. Kerchner 4. Electric Circuits by James William Nilsson Inc.

Objectives

  • 1. To define the different parameter and concepts of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics. 2. To explain the basic concepts of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics. 3. To solve analytical problems regarding Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics.

Outcomes

  • 1. Apply different basic parameters in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as periodic motion, simple harmonic motion, undamped oscillations, interference, diffraction, polarization and prism, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, matter-wave, atomic model, radioactive decay, fusion, fission etc. 2. Explain different basic theories in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as the wave motion for different systems along with energy, different formula for interference, diffraction, polarization special theory of relativity, Compton theory, nuclear transformation, and nuclear reaction etc. 3. Solve quantitative problems in the field of Waves and Oscillations, Optics and Modern physics such as energy of wave motion, wavelength, diffraction pattern, relativistic energy, photon energy, Compton shift, nuclear binding energy etc. 4. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on computer graphics.

References

  • 1. Fundamentals of Physics (10th) - Halliday, Resnick, and Walker 2. Physics for Scientists and Engineers(9th) - Serway and Jewett 3. Concept of Modern Physics (6th) - Arthur Beiser 4. University Physics with Modern Physics (14th) - Hugh D. Young and Roger A. Freedman 5. Modern Physics for Science and Engineering - Marshall L. Burns 6. Waves and Oscillations - Walter Fox Smith 7. The Physics of Vibrations and Waves - H. J. Pain 8. Waves and Oscillations (2nd)- BrijLal and Subramannyam 9. Fundamental of Optics - Francis A. Jenkins and Harvey E.White 10. Introduction to Modern Optics - Grant R. Fowles 11. Fundamental Optical Design - Michael J. Kidger

Objectives

  • 1. To impart basic knowledge on differential and Integral Calculus to solve engineering problems and other applied problems. 2. To develop understanding some of the important aspects of rate of change, area, tangent, normal and volume. 3. To be expert in imparting in depth knowledge of functional analysis such as increasing, decreasing, maximum and minimum values of a function

Outcomes

  • Define the limit, continuity, and differentiability of functions, identify the rate of change of a function with respect to independent variables and describe the different techniques of evaluating indefinite and definite integrals. Apply the concepts or techniques of differentiation and integration to solve the problems related to engineering study. Calculate the length, area, volume, center of gravity and average value related to engineering study

References

  • 1. Calculus (9th) - Howard Anton, Irl C. Bivens (Author), Stephen Davis. 2. Calculus: An Intuitive and Physical Approach (2nd)-Morris Kline.

Objectives

  • 1. To develop basic physics knowledge practically. 2. To practice use of basic scientific instrument.

Outcomes

  • 1. Define the different parameters regarding Waves and Oscillations, Optics, Mechanics, Electricity, Modern physics, and Thermal physics etc. 2. Describe the different phenomena regarding Waves and Oscillations, Optics, Mechanics, Electricity, Modern physics, and Thermal physics etc. 3. Construct Experiments by an individual or by a group to determine different phenomena regarding Waves and Oscillations, Optics, Mechanics, Electricity, Modern physics, and Thermal physics etc. 4. Prepare a report for an experimental work.

References

  • 1. Practical Physics: G. L. Squires 2. Practical Physics: Dr Giasuddin and Md. Sahabuddin. 3. B.Sc. Practical Physics: C. L Arora 4. Practical Physics: S.L. Gupta and V. Kumar

Objectives

  • 1. To develop English language skills to communicate effectively and professionally. 2. To strengthen students’ presentation skills. 3. To develop competency in academic reading and writing.

Outcomes

  • 1. Understand the techniques of academic reading and become familiar with technical terms and develop competency in academic reading, preparing report written communication/ presentation. 2. Analyze any problem critically, analyze and interpret data and synthesize information to provide valid conclusions. 3. Communicate effectively within the shortest possible time to present their reports and academic writings 4. Apply the techniques to find out the main points of any long article within a very limited time as well as know the techniques of any effective writing.

References

  • 1. Langan, J. (2005). College Writing Skills with Readings (6th). McGraw-Hill Publication 2. Interactions 1 (Reading), John Langan, Latest edition, McGraw-Hill Publication 3. Jones, L. (1981). Functions of English. (Student’s Book, 2nd ) Melbourne, Australia: Cambridge University Press. 4. Dixon, R.J. (1987). Complete course in English. (Book 4). New Delhi, India: Prentice Hall of India. (For book presentation) 5. From Paragraph to Essay - Maurice Imhoof and Herman Hudson 6. Headway Series – Advanced Level (2 parts with CDs): Oxford University Press Ltd. 7. Speak like Churchill stand like Lincoln - James C. Humes 8. Cambridge IELTS Practice Book 9. Selected Sample Reports and Selected Research Articles

2nd Semester

Objectives

  • 1. To equip students with factual knowledge that will enable them to learn the history of Bangladesh. 2. To trace the historical roots of Bangladesh as an independent state focusing on the social, cultural and economic developments that have taken place since its independence. 3. To promote an understanding of the development of Bangladesh and its culture. 4. To create an awareness among the students about the Geography, Economy, Politics and Culture of Bangladesh.

Outcomes

  • 1. Identify specific stages of Bangladesh’s political history, through the ancient, medieval, colonial and post-colonial periods and variety of cultural identities of Bangladesh. 2. Explain the economy and patterns of economic changes through qualitative and quantitative analysis. 3. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on Bangladesh studies.

References

  • 1. বাংলা ভাষা ও সাহিত্য: সৌমিত্র শেখর 2. স্বাধীন বাংলাদেশের অভ্যুদয়ের ইতিহাস : মুনতাসীর মামুন 3. Bangladesh Studies: Md. Shamsul Kabir Khan and Daulatunnahar Khanam 4. The Constitution of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh 5. Discovery of Bangladesh: Akbar Ali Khan 6. History of Bangladesh, Vols, 1-3: Sirajul Islam 7. History of Modern Bengal, Vol, 1: R C Majumdar 8. Dynastic History of Bengal: Dr. Abdul Mumin Chowdhury 9. A History of Bangladesh: William Van Schendel 10. Geography of Bangladesh: Harun Er Rashid 11. Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh, Vols, 1-10: Sirajul Islam 12. History of Bengal: (Mughal Period 1526-1765): R. A. Chandra 13. Land of Two Rivers: Nitesh Sengupta 14. A History of Bangladesh: Cambridge University Press 15. Bengali Nationalism and the Emergence of Bangladesh: A.F Salahuddin Ahmed 16. Language Movement and The Making of Bangladesh: Safar Ali Akanda

Objectives

  • 1. To provide a physical interpretation of the Differential Equations and Laplace Transform. 2. To explain the characteristics of Ordinary Differential Equations and Laplace Transform. 3. To apply Laplace and Fourier Transform in solving complex problems. 4. To use differential operations for simplification of complex engineering expressions

Outcomes

  • LEARNING OUTCOMES & GENERIC SKILLS No. Course Learning Outcome (Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to) Bloom’s Taxonomy Assessed POI BNQF Indicator CP CA KP Assessment Methods CO1 Identify differential equations of various types and recognize the basic properties of Laplace and Fourier transform. C1-C2 P.a.2.C3 FS1 1 1, 3 T, F CO2 Interpret the classifications of differential equations and estimate the technique of Laplace transform and Fourier transform of some elementary function. C2 P.a.2.C3 FS3 1 3 T, MT, F CO3 Solve different types of differential equations and apply Laplace transform to Ordinary Differential Equation and Fourier as well as Inverse Fourier transform to make use of boundary value problems in Engineering fields C3 P.a.2.C3 FS3 1,3 3 MT F, ASG

References

  • 1. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations (18th)- M.D.RAISINGHANIA. 2. Differential Equations (3rd)- Shepley L. Ross. 3. Differential Equations by Glen R. Hall. 4. Theory and problems of Laplace Transform, Schaum’s outlines series, Murray R. Spiegel.
  • 1. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations (18th)- M.D.RAISINGHANIA. 2. Differential Equations (3rd)- Shepley L. Ross. 3. Differential Equations by Glen R. Hall. 4. Theory and problems of Laplace Transform, Schaum’s outlines series, Murray R. Spiegel.

Objectives

  • 1. To develop foriegnlanguage skills to communicate effectively and professionally. 2. To strengthen students’ presentation skills. 3. To develop competency in academic reading and writing.

Outcomes

  • 1. Understand the techniques of academic reading and become familiar with technical terms and develop competency in academic reading, preparing report written communication/ presentation. 2. Analyze any problem critically, analyze and interpret data and synthesize information to provide valid conclusions. 3. Communicate effectively within the shortest possible time to present their reports and academic writings 4. Apply the techniques to find out the main points of any long article within a very limited time as well as know the techniques of any effective writing.

References

  • 1. Netzwerk A1 Chapter 1 – 6 2. As per the language

Objectives

  • 1.To discuss the fundamentals of accounting, the use and effects of financial statement for a particular organization. 2. To analyze different types of cost and cost management for different components of a management control system or a business

Outcomes

  • 1. Discuss, describe and interpret a financial accounting statement and the use of financial ratios. The student should be able to understand how the reporting might be affected by a particular (creative) business. 2. Enhance the various elements of a management control system (role, scope, drawbacks, implementation etc.). 3. Determine the variety of cost concepts to be applied in a management control system 4. Select and analyze the nature of a business and outline main features of an appropriate control system

References

  • 1.Managerial Accounting (14th Edition) - Ray Garrison, Eric Noreen and Peter Brewer; McGraw Hill (2011) 2. Accounting Principles (12th Edition) - Jerry J. Weygandt Paul D. Kimmel Donald E. Kieso; Wiley (2015)

Objectives

  • 1. To achieve a basic idea on Object Oriented Programming Language 2. To Present object-oriented aspects of C++ 3. To learn programming with C++

Outcomes

  • 1. Understand the fundamental features of an object-oriented programming language 2. Understand the benefits of object-oriented design and analyse when it is an appropriate methodology to use. 3. Apply and develop object-oriented solutions for small problems, involving multiple objects. 4. Illustrate good programming style and identify the impact of style on developing andmaintaining programs. 5. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on Object Oriented Programming.

References

  • 1. Teach Yourself C++ - Herbert Schidlt 2. Introduction to Algorithms (CLRS) 3rd Edition Sep 2009 3. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ 2014

Objectives

  • Course Objectives: 1. To understand fundamentals of programming such as variables, conditional and iterative execution, methods, etc. 2. To understand fundamentals of object-oriented programming in C++ and Java, including defining classes, invoking methods, using class libraries, etc. 3. To be aware of the important topics and principles of software development. 4. To have the ability to write a computer program to solve specified problems. 5. To be able to use the Java SDK environment to create, debug and run simple Java programs.

Outcomes

  • 1. Knowledge of the structure and model of the Java programming language, (knowledge) 2. Use the Java programming language for various programming technologies (understanding) 3. Develop software in the Java programming language, (application) 4. Evaluate user requirements for software functionality required to decide whether the Java programming language can meet user requirements (analysis) 5. Propose the use of certain technologies by implementing them in the Java programming language to solve the given problem (synthesis) 6. Choose an engineering approach to solving problems, starting from the acquired knowledge of programming and knowledge of operating systems. (evaluation)

References

  • Text books: 1. The Complete Reference C++ : Herbert Schildt 2. Java The Complete Reference: Herbert Schildt. Other References: 1. The C++ Programming Language – Bjarne Stroustrup. 2. Programming with C++ - John R Hubbard (Schaum’s Outlines) 3. The Java Programming Language – Ken Arnold, James Gosling, David Holmes

Objectives

  • 1. To be able to understand the basics of electronic devices like diode, Transistor, MOSFET etc and their applications. 2. To be able to differentiate between the working principal of different electronic components. 3. To become skilled at designing different electronic circuits like rectifier, amplifiers etc. 4. To apply theoretical knowledge for solving complex mathematical problems.
  • The subject aims to provide the student with: 1. An understanding of basic Electronics on which analysis and design of electrical and electronic circuits and systems are based, including lumped circuit, digital and operational amplifier abstractions. 2. The capability to use abstractions to analyze and design simple electronic circuits. 3. An understanding of how complex devices such as semiconductor diodes and field-effect transistors are modeled and how the models are used in the design and analysis of useful circuits. 4. The capability to design and construct electronics circuits, take measurements of circuit behavior and performance, compare circuit models and explain discrepancies.

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will have a strong intuition and insight of the dynamics of electronic components like diodes, BJTs and JFETs, and Op-Amps which can be further used to design and optimize circuit performance. In addition, they will be able to perform:  Rectification of AC signal  Fixed and Self Biasing of BJT  Analyze Drain and Transfer characteristics of n-channel JFET  Mathematical operation using Op-Amp  Determination of frequency response curve of different types of filter by using Op-Amp

References

  • 1. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory -Robert L. Boylestad and Louis Nashelsky 2. Electronic Principles – Albert P. Malvino. 3. Microelectronics Circuits-Adel S. Sedra & Keneth C. Smith-Oxford University Press 4. Operation Amplifiers and Linear Integrated Circuits-Robert F. Coughlin-Prentice Hall of India Private Limited

Objectives

  •  Learning BJT biasing: Fixed & Self biasing  Analyzing drain and transfer characteristics of JFET  Mathematical operation by using Op-Amp  Determining the frequency response curve of Low & High Pass filter using (Op-Amp)

Outcomes

  • After the completion of this course, students will have a strong intuition and insight of the dynamics of electronic components like diodes, BJTs and JFETs, and Op-Amps which can be further used to design and optimize circuit performance. In addition, they will be able to perform:  Rectification of AC signal  Fixed and Self Biasing of BJT  Analyze Drain and Transfer characteristics of n-channel JFET  Mathematical operation using Op-Amp  Determination of frequency response curve of different types of filter by using Op-Amp

References

  •  Electronic Devices and Circuits, 3rd edition, David A. Bell
  •  Electronic Principles, 2nd edition, Albert Malvino and David Bates
  • LAB MANUAL

3rd Semester

Objectives

  • 1. To achieve a basic idea on Object Oriented Programming Language 2. To Present object-oriented aspects of C++ 3. To learn programming with C++

Outcomes

  • 1. Grasp and utilize the fundamental features of an object-oriented programming language 2. Understand the benefits of object-oriented design and analyse when it is an appropriate methodology to use. 3. Deduce object-oriented solutions for small problems, involving multiple objects. 4. Illustrate good programming style and identify the impact of style on developing andmaintaining programs. 5. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on Object Oriented Programming.

References

  • 1. Teach Yourself C++ - Herbert Schidlt 2. Introduction to Algorithms (CLRS) 3rd Edition Sep 2009 3. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ 2014

Objectives

  • 1. To learn the concept of OOP with a pure object-oriented programming language (Java). 2. To learn how to use advance programming features such as GUI design, exception handling and multithreading. 3. To learn how to design and develop a complete real-world software solution.

Outcomes

  • 1. Identify the concept of OOP with a pure object-oriented programming language (Java). 2. Identify and express how to use advance programming features such as GUI design, exception handling and multi-threading. 3. Demonstrate how to design and develop a complete real-world software solution.

References

  • 1. Java, The Complete Reference (9th ed) - Herbert Schildt (2014) 2. Introduction To Java Programming Comprehensive Version 10th Edition - Y. Daniel Liang

Objectives

  • 1. To understand basic control theory along with different types of modeling of a system for the purpose of control 2. To know about various types of system design tools.

Outcomes

  • 1. Explain the fundamental principles of communication systems, various noises of the system and information theory. 2. Analyze various types of modulation techniques and evaluate between them. 3. Design and formulate various communication systems basing on various parameters set as standard.

References

  • 1. Introductory Circuit Analysis - R.L. Boylestad; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd. 2. Communication System – Somon Haykin; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Objectives

  • 1. To verify practically the theories and concepts learned in ICE 2107.

Outcomes

  • 1.Design and build modulation and demodulation systems examining trade offs indifferent communication systems. 2. Develop proto types of different large scale system by working in collaboration.

References

  • 1. Modern Digital & Analog Communication System - B. P. Lathi; OxfordUniversity Press. 2. Communication System - SomonHaykin; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Objectives

  • 1. To understand the different boolean algebra theorems and apply them for simplifying logic functions. 2. To understand Karnaugh map and other methods to perform an algorithmic reduction of multivariable logic functions. 3. To understand the usefulness of combinational circuits: adder, subtractor, code converters encoders/decoders, multiplexers, de-multiplexers, ROM, RAM, PLAs. 4. To design and analysis of clocked sequential circuits, flip-flops, state diagram, state table, different latches. 5. To understand the analysis of various registers, shift-registers, counters and how more complex systems are constructed.

Outcomes

  • 1. Formulate and understand the number system and Boolean algebra and basic properties of Boolean algebra to simplify simple Boolean functions. 2. Understanding and applying the tabulation and Karnaugh map methods for simplifying combination circuits. 3. Identify the basic sequential logic components: SR Latch, Different Flip-Flops and their usage and able to analyze sequential logic circuits. 4. Design and develop different digital systems like shifters, counters, registers by presenting in front of the class.

References

  • 1. Digital Logic and Computer Design by M. Morris Mano 2. Digital Computer Electronics by Albert P. Malvino, Jerald A Brown

Objectives

  • 1. To gain basic knowledge on logic design and the basic building blocks used in digital systems, in particular digital computers. 2. To design different types of combination and sequential logic circuit and their implementations.

Outcomes

  • 1. Operate laboratory equipment by implementing and simulating simple combinational digital circuits. 2. Analyse a given problem and apply the acquired knowledge to design both combinational and sequential circuits. 3. Understand the relationship between abstract logic characterizations and practical implementations while designing a system.

References

  • 1. Digital Logic and Computer Design by M. Morris Manno 2. Digital Computer Electronics by Albert P. Malvino, Jerald A Brown

Objectives

  • 1. To familiarize with modern telecommunications and the architecture of a number of different networks. 2. To impart knowledge on protocol layering and different multiplexing techniques, data compression algorithms to optimize network bandwidth. 3. To familiarize with the use reliability, redundancy and availability of different techniques to meet network performance criteria.

Outcomes

  • 1. Explain data communication system and its components. 2. Percept the digital and analogue representations of signals and analyzethe mechanism of encoding schemas. 3. Identifyandanalyze principles of security, performance, and reliability of different networks. 4. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on data communication

References

  • 1. Data Communication and Networking (4th ed) - Behrouz A Forouzan (2017) 2. Data and Computer Communication - William Stallings 3. Data Communication & Networks – R L Brewster

Objectives

  • 1. To familiarize students with different network simulation technologies. 2. To impart practical knowledge on different signal modulation/demodulation and multiplexing techniques. 3. To bestow the quality of each data transmission methods using both signal processing devices and lab software. 4. To impart the empirical knowledge on data link layer fundamentals, e.g., error detection, correction and flow control techniques.

Outcomes

  • 1. Adopt data communication simulation technologies. 2. Compare each data transmission methods using both signal processing devices and lab software. 3. Apply amplitude, frequency and time division multiplexing techniques to share network bandwidth among multiple users. 4. Develop the empirical knowledge on data link layer fundamentals, e.g., error detection, correction and flow control techniques.

References

  • 1. Data Communication and Networking (4th ed) - Behrouz A Forouzan (2017) 2. Introduction to MATLAB – zyBook

Objectives

  • 1. To Introduce students to the fundamentals of vector and expose students to mathematical application of vector to handle diverse problems which occur in real life 2. To apply preliminary ideas of complex variables and explore the knowledge of applications 3. To understand the real-life problems of vector analysis and complex variables. 4. To Develop the communication skills by presenting different topics on graphs and trees.

Outcomes

  • 1. To Perform standard operations on vectors in two and three-dimensional space 2. To apply problem-solving using vector and complex analysis techniques applied to diverse situations in physics, engineering and other mathematical contexts 3. To Explain the fundamental concepts of complex analysis and their role in modern mathematics and applied contexts. 4. To Demonstrate capacity for mathematical reasoning through analyzing, proving and explaining concepts from complex analysis

References

  • 1. Theory and Problems of Vector Analysis – Murray R. Spiegel (Schaum’s Outline series). 2. Vector Analysis – M. D. Raisinghania. 3. Vector Analysis – Dr. Muhammad Abdus Sattar. 4. Schaum's Outline of Theory and Problems of Complex Variables– Murray R. Spiegel 5. Theory of functions of a Complex Variables – Shanti Narayan.

4th Semester

Objectives

  • 1.Be able to describe signals mathematically and understand how to perform mathematical operations on signals. The operations should include operations on the dependent as well as independent variables. 2.Be familiar with commonly used signals such as unit step, ramp, impulse function, sinusoidal signal and complex exponentials. 3.Be able to classify signals as continuous-time vs. discrete-time, periodic vs. non-periodic, energy signal vs. power signal, odd vs. even, conjugate symmetric vs anti-symmetric. 4.Be able to describe system using linear constant coefficient differential equations and using their impulse response. 5.Understand system properties – linearity, time invariance, presence or absence of memory, causality, bounded-input bounded-output, stability and instability. Be able to identify whether a given system exhibits these properties and its implicit on for practical systems.

Outcomes

  • 1. Define and understand continuous-time signals and discrete-time signal. 2. Apply mathematical transforms and state-variable in order to solve electrical engineering problems. 3. Analyze electrical engineering signals And circuit problems. 4. Design various electrical systems using different transforms and also monitor the performance.

References

  • 1. Continues and Discrete Signals & Systems - S.S. Soliman& M. D. Srinath; Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd. 2. Signal and System (Continuous & Discrete) - R.E. Ziemer; Pearson Education Asia. 3. Principle of Linear Systems and Signals – B.P. Lathi; Oxford University Press.

Objectives

  • 1. To develop a general understanding of basic data structures and algorithms 2. To develop Programming skills for advanced data structures and algorithms

Outcomes

  • 1. Express the fundamentals of static and dynamic data structures and relevant standard algorithms. 2. Demonstrate advantages and disadvantages of specific algorithms and data structures. 3. Analyze basic data structures and algorithms for autonomous realization of simple programs or program parts. 4. Determine and demonstrate bugs in the program, recognize needed basic operations with algorithms and data structures.

References

  • 1. Introduction to Algorithms (CLRS) 3rd Edition Sep 2009 2. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ 2014

Objectives

  • 1. To develop a general understanding of basic data structures and algorithms 2. To develop programming skills for advanced data Structures and algorithms

Outcomes

  • 1. Identify advantages and disadvantages of specific algorithms and data structures. 2. Select basic data structures and algorithms for autonomous realization of simple programs or program parts. 3. Initiate practical knowledge to determine and demonstrate bugs in programs. 4. Formulate new solutions for problems or improve existing code using learned algorithms and data structures.

References

  • 1. Introduction to Algorithms (CLRS) 3rd Edition Sep 2009 2. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++ 2014

Objectives

  • 1. Understand the basic concepts and appreciate the applications of database systems. 2. Know the basics of SQL and construct queries using SQL. 3. Be familiar with a commercial relational database system (Oracle) by writing SQL using the system. 4. Be familiar with the relational database theory and be able to write relational algebra expressions for queries.

Outcomes

  • 1. Describe the basic concepts and appreciate the applications of database systems. 2. Illustrate the basics of SQL and construct queries using SQL 3. Be familiar with a commercial relational database system (Oracle) by writing SQL using the system. 4. Be familiar with the relational database theory and be able to write relational algebra expressions for queries. 5. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on database management system.

References

  • 1. Database System Concept, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth, S. Sudarshan, Fourth edition 2. Files and Databases- An Introduction, Peter D. Smith and G.M. Barnes, AddisonWesley 3. Database Management Systems, Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke, Third edition

Objectives

  • 1. To introduce the basic concepts of database. 2. Developing a real-world database application. 3. To learn the design of a database starting from the conceptual design to the implementation of database schemas and user interfaces to a database.

Outcomes

  • 1.Demonstrate the knowledge in projects with a commercial relational database system (Oracle) and design a team-based project. 2. Utilize the database design principles, SQL and PL SQL. 3. Demonstrate the relational database theory and be able to develop and write relational algebra expressions for queries. 4. Develop the communication skill by presenting topics on database management system.

References

  • 1. Database System Concept, Abraham Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth, S. Sudarshan, Fifth Edition 2. Oracle Database 11g The Complete Reference, Kevin Loney

Objectives

  • 1. To provide a physical interpretation of the Differential Equations and Laplace Transform. 2. To explain the characteristics of Ordinary Differential Equations and Laplace Transform. 3. To apply Laplace and Fourier Transform in solving complex problems. 4. To use differential operations for simplification of complex engineering expressions

Outcomes

  • 1. Identify differential equations of various types and recognize the basic properties of Laplace and Fourier transform. 2. Interpret the classifications of differential equations and estimate the technique of Laplace transform and Fourier transform of some elementary function. Solve different types of differential equations and apply Laplace transform to Ordinary 3. Differential Equation and Fourier as well as Inverse Fourier transform to make use of boundary value problems in Engineering fields

References

  • 1. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations (18th)- M.D.RAISINGHANIA. 2. Differential Equations (3rd)- Shepley L. Ross. 3. Differential Equations by Glen R. Hall. 4. Theory and problems of Laplace Transform, Schaum’s outlines series, Murray R. Spiegel.

Objectives